Posts Tagged ‘listed’

Produced by Cameron McKirdyPro Cuddler with CuddleLife.com

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Bug Out Bag and Bicycle – Winter Camping Gear Setup

Dear Survival Journal,

I got a way late start.  Was also considering busing to the warming center in Astoria, OR.  That’s smart. 

Hiking 7 miles ain’t.  But I was determined to bog through the uphill swamp: half in the dark.  I got turned around at one point where trees fell over the path.  I also slipped once, but rehearsed in my head what to do.  I threw my 1 gallon water jug, and braced myself.  Yup, I carried a heavy water container from Ave. U to The Hiker Cabins on Tillamook Head.  My shoulders and arms are torn up.  My 110 liter Kelty backpack had to be 70 pounds.  

Plus, I was running on a bum sprained ankle…wore a too tight brace…My left shoulder hurt the most.  It was so tight.  But I had an indica BHO cartridge in my vape pen to finish off.  It was charging in my bag on the hike with a portable power bank charger.  I brought too much stuff.  Like 6 pairs of socks, an umbrella, a dud smoke grenade, and a giant tarp.  It’s 11am – dark at 4:25pm.  So cold.  My hands are numb. 

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Email Cam The Cuddler and Survival Bros Founder: thesurvivalbros@gmail.com

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By Cam The Cuddler

Survival Bros Founder Cam and blogger Kelvin cover essential gear stored in the trunk of a reliable vehicle in case of a disaster.  We both live on the Oregon Coast, and are actively preparing for a tsunami to wipe out our hometown of Seaside, #OR  What do you think this American #prepper has left out?  My YouTube subscribers think he needs more water, a BB gun, and a big fixed blade knife for extra protection.  However, I can tell you, this guy has dug his own well on his family’s property.  So, he meets the one gallon per day, per person quota.  Kelvin also has another backup vehicle that is expertly maintained, and fast – a Dodge Stealth.  

Share this video with other preppers, like, comment, and SUBSCRIBE on YouTube. Thanks.  

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Produced By Cameron and Kelvin of #survivalbros

Hey Friends,

Cam here.  Thanks for visiting my emergency preparedness blog.  We are pumping out a bunch of new videos this month, so I hope you like watching them.  Please share this quick informational production with friends.  Here’s the short link to copy and paste:  https://youtu.be/7O-KCu_Jqf4  This is important and fun stuff for preppers of all skill levels.  

We threw this kit together with gear items on hand that were laying around unused and therefore extra.  We have the basic survival necessities covered for the most part, but improvements can always be made.  I did notice there wasn’t an emergency blanket in this canister, and they can be purchased for $2.  However, if there’s a tsunami wave on the Oregon Coast, I like my odds of living.  I have kits like this one gallon cache, plus backpacks loaded with necessities, and bikes with racks placed strategically all over the Pacific Northwest. 

What’s your plan for safe escape from danger?  Stay healthy out there.  And keep your head on a swivel.  Few things are more valuable that situational awareness.  Cheers.

 

Watch Cam’s new #vandwelling #experience for Survival Bros . com

Preparedness Expert Cameron McKirdy from #SurvivalBros lists his gear items for living in a 1994 Chevy 20 van and tent camping.  He is on tour in Oregon, and making new videos for viewers.  Subscribe to our channel for travel vlogs, and more #vanlife living ideas.  Comments are appreciated. 

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By President Cameron McKirdy

I challenge you to carry a water container wherever you go on the daily!  You’ll be healthier, and happier.  I do this to stay hydrated, and make sure I’m not too over caffeinated.  

BONUS CHALLENGE:  DRINK 125 OUNCES OF AGUA EACH DAY.  

Plus, try adding lemon juice to your beverage to stimulate your metabolism, improve your digestion, and aid in the detoxification process.  

Did you know drinking cold water will burn extra calories for you too?  It’s true.  Just don’t drink a ton of water at once, because you can die from too much liquid intake.  

Thanks for supporting the blog!  Make the most of today.  Take care of yourself, and each other.  Peace, love, and big hugs to you.

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

This week I got up early and drove the Volkswagen Vanagon out to the legendary Goodwill Outlet near the Portland International Airport, or PDX.  I slept nearby, for free, in the Shari’s Resturant parking lot.  As a hustler, I knew I had to get to Goodwill before the place opens up at 8 AM.  I had my smartphone on me, charged, to scan barcodes, and research items online.  I used the eBay, and Amazon applications for quick access to information.

It was a feeding frenzy inside.  No time to shoot video when you’re trying to make money.  Goodwill charges only $1.67 per pound for most anything, besides CDs, DVDs, and stuff in the display case, as far as I know.  At the end, you roll your shopping cart onto a scale, like weighing your vehicle at a garbage dump.  You’ll see my thrifting haul in the HD Survival Bros video below.  I had to dig threw a bunch of trash to find anything acceptable for potential reselling, and keeping.  You will get your hands dirty.  Try to avoid piss blankets, and scan everything with your eyes to make less work for yourself.  My strategies netted me a Phillips Norelco electric razor, Wii video game, Levis flannel shirt, wall charger, scarf, two GPS units by Garmin and Magellen, fanny back for ultralight backpacking, and a Nike Max Air backpack.  I think I did excellent considering I spent just $7.44.  

If you like this vlog, please SUBSCRIBE TO #SURVIVALBROS on YouTube!  Thank your for watching and supporting this project.  Best wishes from the gym, where I’m sniping free WiFi in the kids playroom.

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A line forms at the entrance of the Goodwill Outlet Store for an 8 AM opening

Produced by http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Hustling isn’t for lazy people.  You have to think on your feet, and react quickly.  One must follow their heart, and instincts to get money.  Buying and selling the goods you got takes skill too.  Then you have to deliver on your promise to the customer in order to maintain your street cred.  Do you have what it takes to be a hustler?  I made this video to help others get ideas about reselling their thrift shop finds, not to simply to show off my abilities.  But damn I’m good.  No.  Hustling, making a video on it, and articulating ideas in an article is not for the lazy. Good money is earned.  My thoughts are free.  Check out the picked profit breakdown below.

Total Value and Asking price on thrifting haul:

1. Price is Right Wii game + $20

2. Tiger Woods 08 game + $25

3. Baby Einstein DVDs + $20

4. Batman CD Player + $45 (SOLD!)

5. Starbucks Tumbler + $20

6. Lion King Disney Mug + $20

7. Sony Walkman Radio + $40

8. Octopus Ring + $20 = $210

*Spent only $19!

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If you’re registered on WordPress, then please LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and SUBSCRIBE for other thrifting haul video productions and more adventures.  I’d love to hear about your favorite thrift store find, or biggest profit made from reselling items from Goodwill.  Happy hustling!

 

Produced by http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Learn about items helpful to have on hand just in case of a disaster.  These survival products could save your life!  So stockpile this stuff, and other gear you would want.  Imagine going through adversity.  What would want for tools?  Let the community know below.

Please share this video with friends so they can make an emergency kit.  Like, comment, and SUBSCRIBE to #SurvivalBros  Enter your email on this page to get all of the news.  Plus, check out previous blog posts in the archives.  Your support is truly appreciated.

Emergency Kit Items Listed:

– Backpack with Straps

– Emergency Whistle

– Garbage Bag 

– Dust Mask

– Band-Aids

– Hand Sanitizer

– Water Bottle (1 gallon a day for 3 days, for each person)

– Rain Poncho

– Emergency Blanket

– Flashlight

All free of charge thanks to #Allstate 

By Survival Bros President Cameron McKirdy

Watch our new HD video production to get ideas of easy meals you can create while living in your vehicle.  I’ve been sleeping in my 1986 Volkswagen Vanagon GL, or vandwelling for eight months straight now.  Being out there, and doing IT, teaches you what it takes to plan for a long road trip.  However, maybe this blog post will inspire you to do more car camping.  It’s been an amazing experience, and my pleasure to share with you.  I’m so glad I’ve been able to see more of the Pacific Northwest while I’m young, wild, and free.  Now I just need to find more stickers to paste on my VW Bus.

Many food suggestions shown in the YouTube video are also ideal for backpacking, because they are ready instantly with hot water. Other dishes, or side meals are fully prepared for consumption as is, such as the individually wrapped granola bars.  I also eat plenty of fresh organic fruit, and drink spring or distilled water.  No tap.

Tip:  Use different sizes of Ziploc bags to store food items in, and label each kit with a permanent pen.  You can compact the plastic storage sacks, and take most of the air out of them, so they are almost vacuum sealed, and take up minimal space.  Then put the locked baggies in larger bins, or the pockets of your Everyday Carry backpack for safekeeping.

1986 VW Vanagon getting it done

1986 VW Vanagon getting it done

Please SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube Channel HERE!  I will follow back if you make similar videos.  Like, comment, and share this blog post with friends. Let us know if you are vandweller, and what your setup looks like.  Visit the Survival Bros HD Videos page above for all of the latest adventures.

Food Kit

Check out my other blog:  http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Feel free to email me if you like:  thesurvivalbros@gmail.com

 

By Chris Miller

 

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Backpacking Gear for the Florida Trail

Usually I try to keep my pack weight down, though I don’t really consider myself an ultra light hiker. I can live comfortably out of a pack weighing no more than 20 pounds for months at a time. And that is including food and water. My base weight, the weight of my gear not including food and water, usually hovers around the ten pound mark, though I have a tendency to carry multiple paperbacks at a time which can push that weight up a bit.

So what’s in my pack?  Let’s start with what I consider the essentials, sleeping gear and clothing.
I sleep in a cheap Walmart $30 40 degree sleeping bag made by Ozark Trails. It is one of the smallest sleeping bags around which means it packs up into a very tight space. This is one of those occasions when you don’t need to spend a ton of money on a top of the line sleeping bag.  Is it warm enough? Probably not for a lot of winter activities, and even in Florida it can get cold in January. But the sleeping bag is always slipped inside my REI Minimalist Bivy. This adds a few degrees as well as allowing me to easily stealth camp. I also usually sleep in my Under Armour base layer.  My base layer is one of my most trusted pieces of survival equipment. I probably wouldn’t have survived the week of 20 degree nights stealth camping in Austin Texas that I went through a few years ago if it wasn’t for them and my winter hat and gloves. Also something which is always in my pack.
Other than that, a change of socks and underwear, my Petzl headlamp, a 5×7 tarp, a Thermarest Prolite sleeping pad, a Nike Storm Fit rain jacket, an REI Revelcloud packable jacket, a Sawyer mini water filter and a pair of what I call sleeping socks, socks which only get worn at night when I’m in my sleeping bag rounds out most of the rest of my gear.

Sure there are a few other things, random assorted things clipped inside my pack or stuffed in Ziploc bags near the top where they are easy to get to. The toilet paper and first aid kit, the mini Bic lighter and fire starter cubes. I also have a clip with several safety pins, a GSI plastic spoon, some rubber bands, a small set of nail clippers and a P-51 can opener.  You’ll notice that I didn’t mention a knife of any kind.  Airlines are pretty picky about letting you bring knives on board and I have found that when you are stealth camping in urban environments it is very likely that you will at some point be stopped by the police. Usually when I’m hiking I’ll carry a small Swiss Army knife. I’ve never needed anything more serious no matter the situation but have recently added a Buck Paklite Caper to my gear. Mostly for batoning wood for fires.  But for the Florida Trail I wasn’t able to pack a knife and in the rush before leaving I had failed to mail them ahead to myself. So I was without a knife in the swamps and back country of Florida.

Backpack Gear List

REI Lookout 40 backpack 53 oz
With 3 Liter Camelback water bladder and insulated drinking hose
Ozark Trail 40 degree synthetic mummy bag 32 oz
REI Minamalist Bivy 15 oz
Thermarest Prolite Small Sleeping pad 11 oz
Blue patched Silnylon 5×7 tarp with ropes 11 oz
Nike Storm Fit Rain Jacket 16 oz
Winter hat and gloves 3 oz
Underarmour bottoms lg 6 oz
Underarmour top xl 8 oz
REI Revelcloud Jacket md 12.5 oz
2 Extra Pair socks 6 oz
Petzl Headlamp w/batteries 3 oz
4 tent stakes w/stuff sack 2 oz
Sawyer Mini Water filter 2 oz
32oz Gatorade bottle 1 oz
Toiletries, First Aid Kit 8 oz
Notebook, Guidebook, Pens 32 oz
Swing Trek Umbrella 7 oz
Tent – Freestanding cheap Ebay tent 31 oz

259.5 oz or 16.2 Pounds

Much heavier than I’m normally used to and this is mostly because it is a new, heavier pack with the ability to not only carry more food but which also has a larger water carrying capacity. Florida is notorious for having bad tasting water which no amount of filtering or flavoring would cover and I wanted to be able to camel up when I found clear water.  Also, the cheap tent was a last minute add on. I wasn’t sure how I felt about sleeping in a bivy on the levees in Florida knowing that alligators were so close. As it was one of the hikers ahead of me woke up to the sound of one snoring next to their tent.  So how did the gear hold up?  Most of the gear are old standards that I’ve lived with for years so I knew what to expect. But there were a few newer items that hadn’t been extensively tested before.

Sawyer Mini Water Filter

The first was the Sawyer Mini water filter. Coming in at 2 oz I had used this on only one other two month long backpacking trip along the Oregon coast and it had held up well under the minimal water filtering I had done.  It comes with a squeeze bag for forcing water through the filter as well as a back flush syringe for cleaning out the filter when it becomes clogged. It has a 0.1-micron filter which means I never really have to worry about Giardia, e. coli or salmonella. And the best feature, at least for me, is the threaded end which can be screwed onto most soda and water bottles. This lets you fill your bottle from any source, screw on the filter and squirt the water directly into your mouth.

The biggest drawback, at least on hiking in the Florida swamps, was that the water often had enough silt suspended in it that I had to back flush the filter on an almost daily basis. I’ve heard this complaint from other hikers as well and they say for the slight difference in weight they carry the full Sawyer water filter which doesn’t seem to clog as easily.  This year the swamp was little on the dry side and at least one long stretch had very little in the way of drinkable water. Another hiker had gotten so low that he decided to drink his own urine. He turned around, filled up his Smartwater bottle, screwed on his Sawyer filter and shot a good healthy stream into his mouth.  “Hmm, still salty,” was his only response.  That’s because the Sawyer filters were not meant to filter the salt out of water. Just an FYI if you are thinking about drinking your own urine anytime soon.

Cheap Ebay Tent

I liked this tent mostly because it was freestanding and cost about $20 shipped directly from China.
The problem was that those also seemed to be the only good things about it.  The tent was listed by a few different Chinese Ebayer’s under titles like “Camping Tent Single Layer Waterproof Outdoor Portable UV-resistant Army green” or “Portable Camp Camping Tent Single Layer Waterproof Outdoor UV-resistant 1 Person.”  It was a one person tent that weighed just under two pounds and it could easily be stuffed in a side pouch or rolled up and strapped to the bottom of my pack. I wanted to make a few modifications to it to make it more camouflaged and perhaps add a rain flap over the zipper on the door but there wasn’t time before the trip.  It help up fine in decent weather and even light rain. That’s when I noticed that the floor wasn’t waterproof. This wasn’t a big deal until some of the heavier thunderstorms rolled in. Even though they lasted less than half an hour the wind would force the rain through the walls of the tent and I would end up sleeping in puddles for a while. Thankfully I had my bivy.  The storms also brought out another drawback of this tent. That the poles were weak. In the mornings I would notice that section after section of the poles were splitting and had to be repaired with Gorilla Tape.  But I was glad to have even this cheap tent to keep the hoardes of mosquitos at bay. Even then, sometimes just after sunset, the cloud of them would be so thick outside the tent that I thought they might be able to collectively break the flimsy tent and suck me dry.  Walmart used to sell a Junior Dome freestanding tent for about the same price that was only slightly heavier. It was meant for kids but I used that thing for years before passing it on to someone else. An act I sometimes regret as Walmart has discontinued their production.  Let’s just say that the cheap Chinese tent didn’t make it back from Florida.

No Cook

This hike I decided to go No Cook, meaning that I wouldn’t be packing my pot and stove and that I’d be eating everything cold.  For me this works out really well though I can understand how some people would prefer hot meals.  It meant that I’d never have to resupply fuel and I would have more room in my pack for food.  So what did I eat?  Bagels, cream cheese and sliced salami were most of my big meals. Protein shakes and Multi-Grain breakfast bars were usually my breakfasts and Snickers, Chia seeds and Little Debbie Cosmic Brownies were my snacks throughout the day.

Drinks, besides the protein drinks, were powdered Gatorade for the electrolytes and Crystal Light packets to flavor the water.  The big comfort food for me was the protein shakes. They have become a standard backpacking food for me. I carry about a pound of vanilla whey protein along with roughly the same amount of either non fat dry milk or Nido which is powdered whole milk. I prefer the Nido not only for the extra calories but because it doesn’t foam up as much when shaking the shake.  I make the shakes in my 32 oz Gatorade bottle, great because of its wide mouth. Usually I’ll drink some of the water off the top to make room for the powders. Personally I don’t measure what goes into the bottle. I’ll simply add a roughly equal amount of spoonfuls of powder, mixing it in gently at first to make room for more powder. When I think its ready I’ll just put the cap on and shake violently for a while.  The whey protein is great for repairing the damage to my muscles caused by hiking and generally this is just a tasty shake that I never seem to get sick of, which is pretty important in any foods you carry.  The only drawback was going through airport security. I was pulled aside for a security check and they emptied the contents of my food bag. When the TSA agent pushed everything aside he picked up the ziplock bags of what looked like kilos of cocaine. Luckily he laughed.  That doesn’t mean he didn’t swab down everything I owned looking for traces of drugs though.

All in all the gear held up well.  The tent though was left in a dumpster somewhere in Florida.  I’ll stick with the Sawyer Mini and I may start going No Cook on more of my travels.  The pack was a bit heavy for my tastes. Leaving the southern terminus of the Florida Trail I was carrying four liters of water, roughly 8 ½ pounds, more than I’ve ever carried before, and way too much food. I’ll probably go back to the 30 liter pack I usually use for the next adventure, which will probably be hitchhiking across the US.  And next time I go hiking in Florida I’ll probably pack some bug spray.

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