Posts Tagged ‘disaster’

By Cameron McKirdy

Click the shortlink here to view it on the Survival Bros YouTube Channel:  https://youtu.be/HaIbx0UvPR0

Check out Seattle Fire Dept.’s custom Medic One rescue bicycle created to help people overcome adversity during a survival type situation, or basic injury outdoors.  Like this cycling setup?  What else would you put on this bike frame to carry items?  Comment below.   Thanks to the Seattle Fire Department for taking the time to educate, and assist the gracious public.  The Fremont Solstice Fair is a spectacular event.  Mark your calendars for this celebration next year.  

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL, LIKE, COMMENT, AND SHARE this HD video production from #SurvivalBros

Seattle Fire Dept. Medic One Bike

Photo of Seattle Fire Dept’s Medic One Response Bicycle Loaded with Emergency Preparedness Gear

 

Produced by http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Learn about items helpful to have on hand just in case of a disaster.  These survival products could save your life!  So stockpile this stuff, and other gear you would want.  Imagine going through adversity.  What would want for tools?  Let the community know below.

Please share this video with friends so they can make an emergency kit.  Like, comment, and SUBSCRIBE to #SurvivalBros  Enter your email on this page to get all of the news.  Plus, check out previous blog posts in the archives.  Your support is truly appreciated.

Emergency Kit Items Listed:

– Backpack with Straps

– Emergency Whistle

– Garbage Bag 

– Dust Mask

– Band-Aids

– Hand Sanitizer

– Water Bottle (1 gallon a day for 3 days, for each person)

– Rain Poncho

– Emergency Blanket

– Flashlight

All free of charge thanks to #Allstate 

By Cameron McKirdy

This week Survival Bros went hiking in the woods near Cannon Beach, Oregon to kill and eat a bunny.  We saw, but didn’t catch the animal, so we explored the forest near logging roads.  To my shock we stumbled upon a massive survival shelter made from tarps, logs, cordage, and more.  There was even a 4-person tent inside, and the shack had a clean tarp floor.  The place was loaded with camping gear, and everything you’d need to be self-sufficient in the outdoors for a long time.  Watch the HD video to see how it was built, and what’s stored on the site.  Join the Survival Bros community on YouTube, and SUBSCRIBE TODAY!  It’s free of charge.  

 

Best Tarp Shelter in Woods

The best tarp shelter we’ve ever seen in the woods

By Cameron McKirdy I sling a day pack on my back nearly every day.  I’ve mentioned the types of things I have in it before, like gear, food, and a warm change of clothes.  So when I discovered the Ribz Front Pack, I was stoked.  This innovative, steroid injected version of a fanny pack solves many of the challenges I face when backpacking.  Here I am with it on the Hummocks Trailhead near Mount St. Helens in Washington State. Ribz Front Pack One issue I have with a regular backpack is I’m constantly taking it off to grab water, my cell phone, or something else that isn’t handy.  With Ribz Wear, it’s all right in front of me, so I can continue trail blazing.  I also mention in the video how backpacks catch on trees when I have to duck under them.  It usually happens a few times each hike, and I practically have to crawl under the obstacle.  With my gear in front, navigating through heavy brush is considerably easier.  The best part of this system is the pack is easy to adjust.  My Dad’s chest and waist are smaller than mine, so after he used it, a quick tug on the straps in back and in front made it comfortable again for me.  Plus, Ribz have long, padded shoulder straps, so it feels like a natural extension of your body.   Mount St. Helens Adventures Map Check out the map of different Mount St. Helens Adventures.  Back to the Ribz Front Pack review, I must mention the Large version I tested can hold absurd amounts, with an 11 liter capacity.  Even with it packed full, I was able to swing my arms freely.  My dad wore it, and noted that you could still use hiking poles with it on.  Ribz makes smaller Front Packs with 8 liters of room too.  Internally, there are separate pouches to keep smaller items organized.  These elastic lined compartments will hold all your tools close to your ribs, and prevent them from rattling around.  We both ran with it, and the pack remained snug, not bouncing around, or swaying side to side.Mount St. Helens View In conclusion, the Ribz Front Pack is an excellent tool itself.  The quality is unbelievable, and far superior to what I expected.  It’s lightweight, at only 11 ounces, so it beats a backpack there too.  However, I think it would be best suited for use with a rear pack, so the weight of your supplies can be evenly distributed forward and back, thus giving you better posture than wearing one or the other.  But if you’re into ultralight backpacking, Ribz might be a dream come true.  You can’t machine wash Ribz, but it cleans up nicely with a wet rag.  I love the Cordura brand water resistant, ripstop material it’s fabricated with.  I will be sporting my Ribz for a long time.  I like it so much I want the smaller 8 liter pack too for shorter trips, and cross country running.  I just don’t know which color to get next.  Check out http://www.ribzwear.com to grab yours.

Cam makes instant coffee with an emergency water packet at Loowit Lookout near Mt. St. Helens in Washington State.  Subscribe to Survival Bros on Youtube for more!  Thanks for watching!  Feel free to comment.

Mt. St. Helens SelfieCam snaps a selfie with his dad on the trail

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

The first nasty storm of the season is underway on the Oregon Coast.  The wind is bending trees, and flooding is a possibility.  I’m surprised the power is still on.  Seaside, OR is expected to have gusts up to 80 miles per hour!  Have a survival kit together, and an emergency plan for your family.  Here’s a checklist of supplies to gather just in case of a disaster.

– Water (A gallon per person per day for a minimum of 3 days.)

– Fuel AKA gas for cooking, and dry wood for fire

– Food (Stores could close for days without electricity.  Don’t buy perishable goods that need to be refrigerated.  Think fruit.)

– Candles

– Flashlights and headlamps with fresh batteries

– Blankets

– Shelter (It’s probably a good idea to stay inside, so you don’t get wet and sick.)

– Emergency Weather Radio

– Toys for kids, and treats for pets, because they will be scared in a super storm

– First Aid

– Gas (Fill up your vehicle in case there’s a rush for fuel, and you can’t get some later.)

– Books (Maybe ones on emergency planning.  We don’t want you to lose your mind without TV.)

– Whistle to signal for help

– Multi-tool and Wrench to turn off water, etc.

– Moist wipes, and garbage bags for sanitation and personal hygiene

– Local maps

– Manual Can Opener

– Generator and/or solar charger for electrical devices

– Cash/Silver/Barter Items

– Rain Gear/Warm clothes

– Prescription Medications

– Lighter and waterproof matches

– Paper and Pen for notes, and more checklists

– Communications: Cell Phones with chargers, and two-way radios

With all or most of these things you should be good to go, and ready for a super storm bringing flooding.  If you can think of any other handy items, please leave your suggestions in the comment section.  Thanks, and wish us Oregonians good luck this weekend.  It’s
going to be a wild one.  Peace and love from Survival Bros. 

Here’s a link to the live webcam in Seaside, OR on The Lanai at The Cove so you can checkout the current conditions.

There’s no flooding on Highway 101 right now, but high tide isn’t until this evening.

seaside odot cam

seaside odot floodingIt looks like Highway 101 is starting to flood!  Be careful out there.

Cameron McKirdy produced this in 2011 during the tsunami wave scare! This shows how he prepared for an emergency in real time. If you haven’t created a bug-out-bag for this sort of thing, now is the time. What do you think of the video? Let’s hope the big one doesn’t hit this helpless coastal town.

Unbelievable footage of a car being launched at Cameron McKirdy!