Posts Tagged ‘care’

Produced By Cameron and Kelvin of #survivalbros

Hey Friends,

Cam here.  Thanks for visiting my emergency preparedness blog.  We are pumping out a bunch of new videos this month, so I hope you like watching them.  Please share this quick informational production with friends.  Here’s the short link to copy and paste:  https://youtu.be/7O-KCu_Jqf4  This is important and fun stuff for preppers of all skill levels.  

We threw this kit together with gear items on hand that were laying around unused and therefore extra.  We have the basic survival necessities covered for the most part, but improvements can always be made.  I did notice there wasn’t an emergency blanket in this canister, and they can be purchased for $2.  However, if there’s a tsunami wave on the Oregon Coast, I like my odds of living.  I have kits like this one gallon cache, plus backpacks loaded with necessities, and bikes with racks placed strategically all over the Pacific Northwest. 

What’s your plan for safe escape from danger?  Stay healthy out there.  And keep your head on a swivel.  Few things are more valuable that situational awareness.  Cheers.

 

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I’m cruising along. Listening to Tupac. Going through the busiest intersection in town, when I fly over my handlebars, and crash onto the pavement and my bike. I walked it off. And carried my bike to the sidewalk, hobbling.

The cargo net attached to my rear bike rack got unhooked, and wrapped up tightly in the gears. I stopped instantly. I was bleeding instantly too, and I’ve never gotten bruises so quickly. I have road rash on my left knee, and gashes, and scrapes here and there. It could have been worse.

Now I’m recovering. My wounds are clean, but still exposed. I’ve got my leg elevated, but the pain is setting in. I didn’t see it coming. Of course I wasn’t wearing protective gear. It was the nicest day on the Oregon Coast in months, so I didn’t wear my biking gloves, or pants. Shorts though, I wasn’t naked. The only thing I was prepared for was the fall. I’ve studied martial arts, so I know how to break fall, and minimize impact. Still, I’m going to be recovering for weeks. I didn’t have first aid on me either. But I usually do in my backpack. I was traveling light. Don’t worry about me. I’m going to make it. I’m a survivor. I hope chicks really do dig scars.

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Nothing is more precious than a child. That’s why babysitting is so important. I recently watched three girls. They tried to break me. I regulated. Everybody came out better.

First off, babies are out of control. They get into everything. You really can’t babyproof a house, because they can climb anything like King Kong. They do as much damage too. The two younger girls I watched are 18 months, and three years old! They usually don’t play together, so I’m always running down one of them. I’ve never drank so much coffee, and been so exhausted.

Kids are tornados. I’ve been blasted with Cheerios, toys, and gale force sneezes. The baby is always squirting something out. She is almost potty trained though. Her sisters are helping her figure it out. And for the record, I’m not afraid to change a diaper. Every prepper should check that off their to do list!

I’ve found rugrats typically need activities like drawing or reading. This stimulates their mind, and they will make less messes for you. It’s also good to tell them NO! And let them cry. I can’t cater to everything they want. When kids are fussy, they seem just frustrated or tired. Naps are your best friend.

It’s also crucial to teach them while playing. They don’t even know they’re learning while playing games. We go over things like colors, names, and numbers. The squirts love to learn words and repeat what I say. They are sponges. That’s why they can only watch so much TV. I’d rather they play then zone out.

Finally, but maybe most important, it’s key to make the kids feel safe and nurtured. I’m always smiling around them, and ready to play. The infant always says, “tickle me!” She is so funny. The children play all types of games naturally. Being around them has made me more childlike, which is great. SURVIVAL BROS invites you to inspire a kid. Spend time around them. You can learn from them as you teach.

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Baby yoga time with Cam. We also did push-ups.

Ya caught me with my pants down! I’m blogging while icing my leg. Last week I flew over my handle bars, and landed on lava rocks, biking down the steep McKenzie River Trail. This is my recovery process, with information that could help you heal.

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When I went over my bike, I was wearing a helmet, but not gloves. Stupid. My hands are cut up, and my leg is still swollen and bruised, as pictured. I was covered in dirt, and dripping blood. Before I showered I cleaned my wounds with povidone-iodine antiseptic wipes, and sterilization wipes I typically use to sanitize my hands. Then I iced, but all I had to use was a small ice pack made to chill a sandwich or something else in your lunch. I really needed a large ice pack to go from my knee to my hip.

It’s been 5 days since my bike accident. My leg hurts less now, so I’ve been lightly massaging it. It’s instinctual. Massaging gets blood flowing there, and relaxes battered muscles. I’ve been using the R.I.C.E. method of: rest, ice, compression, elevation. In addition, I poured hydrogen peroxide on my cuts to kill any bacteria. Plus, I have been gently exercising and lightly stretching. I went for a long walk this morning. The only other thing I want to do is put tea tree oil on the surface of my black and blue bruised skin. With more attention and rest, my leg will heal up, and I will stop walking with a slight limp. Be safe out there on your bikes!

When you fall, and get hurt, your will to endure is being tested. You have to get up, dust off, take a breath, and ride on. It’s not easy knowing you can get hurt again, but you have to move forward. I had to fight through the pain, and get my head straight. I couldn’t lose my focus and end up getting injured further. All that mattered was getting to the truck, so I could get to basic first aid supplies, and leftover Hawaiian pizza.

In retrospect, next time I will wear more protective gear, and bring a small First Aid kit. I could have been stranded on the trail for hours with a broken leg. There were only a few people on that path, and I couldn’t get cell phone service. Be smart about the situations you put yourself in. Biking in remote locations should be done with extreme caution. Train hard, rest easy.

– Cameron McKirdy

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