Posts Tagged ‘adventure’

By Cameron McKirdy

Survival Bros combs The Woods, and identifies King Bolete, or Porcini Mushrooms in Oregon!  Hunted in the Clatsop County forest near the Pacific Ocean.  Cameron foraged, dried, and ate them for a meal off the land.  Dried fungi will last a very long time in your kit. Please share this Survival Bros video, and SUBSCRIBE on YouTube.  Many more Adventures coming Summer 2019…

Copy and Paste: https://youtu.be/SKoR_Qk6ET8
Filmed on 6/5/19 

#pnw #fungi #mushrooms #oregon #cam

Filmed by Cameron McKirdy in Oregon, USA

Showing you gear I used to endure a cold night in Oregon. I forgot my sleeping bag at a friend’s house, so I had to get by with only an emergency, and wool blanket. It was close to 40 degrees outside in the morning when I started the van. I got up by 5 AM, to get my vehicle ready for the road again. You don’t want all of your boxes and tubs dumping over on corners. The struggle is real on Survival Bros.

Cam’s Preparedness Advice: Make sure you have a barrier or two between you and the ground (or metal auto floor). Then wrap up in layers, with an emergency mylar blanket around yourself! Thanks for the invention Astronauts. Also, huddle up with a friend if you can overnight, and keep moving if you get really cold. Well, I survived to fight more today…Next stop, free coffee in town! #urban #scavenging

Subscribe to Survival Bros on YouTube HERE!

Keep blankets in your vehicle just in case!

By Cameron McKirdy

Attention my fellow Survival Bros: Check our my new vehicle for car camping!  The old 2.1 Liter Volkswagen Vanagon has been sold to a hippie.  This 1994 Chevrolet G-20 van cost $2,000, and has 136,000 miles on it.  I’m hopeful that the Chevy will be much more reliable than the 1986 VW bus I lived in for nearly 2.5 years!  I must have had AAA tow my last ride 13 times to a mechanic or home.

#SurvivalBros is creating a new video series on vandwelling in this RV.  You’re gonna want to see every episode of my travels.  I’m bursting with information, and tips to share about living on the road.  Share this vlog and blog post with friends into #vandwelling   Subscribe today on YouTube HERE!

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Hanging out at “Surfer’s Parking Lot” near The Cove in Seaside, Oregon. Checking the wave conditions and people watching along the coast.

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

Chill out on the North Fork of the McKenzie River with #SurvivalBros and Papilio Oregonius butterflies.  This is the official insect of Oregon State.  Filmed near Cougar Hot Spring, in the Willamette National Forest.  SUBSCRIBE NOW ON YOUTUBE FOR MORE!  

What a spectacular day this was by the water.  The sun scorched my naked body.  It burned getting into the 106 degree water later that evening at Terwilliger Hot Springs.  I did dive headfirst into the crystal clear river.  Exhilarating.  However, do you have any idea how hard it is to hold your junk with one hand?  Just saying, it wasn’t staying put.  Thankfully through the power of editing, the family jewels remained in safe keeping.  

I ventured to this sacred spot two weeks earlier, and saw the same collection of butterflies!  I counted 40.  I’m amazed they were still there when I returned.  My friends are posted up hard in heaven.  They danced around me as I paid my respects.  This area produces insanely large moths too, like this one I spotted heading into a shower last summer.

Giant Moth in OR

Thanks for watching our fun video productions.  This blog has been going strong for four years now.  Can you believe it?  Your support is so appreciated.  You rock!

Oregon Swallowtail Butterflies

By Cameron McKirdy

In these HD #survivalbros videos I source product, or pick stuff, to potentially resell at a profit.  I purchased nearly 27 pounds of Goodwill donations at 99 cents per lb in one day, as seen in the first vlog below.  Watch these guides to learn more about picking, aka hustling.  I chose a diverse range of merchandise, buying everything from purses to Nintendo Wii video games.  I think I scored on my thrifting haul adventure, but you  be the judge.  SUBSCRIBE TO SURVIVAL BROS ON YOUTUBE HERE to join the conversation.  Thanks for watching.     

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Cam found Minion Goggles at The Bins in Portland, Oregon

Pro Tips for  Shopping at The Goodwill Outlet Bins:

  1. Wear gloves.  This way you can toss stuff, and protect your hands from sharp objects…
  2. Weigh your cart several times to see where your at, and to preview what you may spend.
  3. Take a chance on an item or two that you know nothing about.  It may prove to be a super find.

More advice coming in blog articles soon…..

 

Produced by http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Hustling isn’t for lazy people.  You have to think on your feet, and react quickly.  One must follow their heart, and instincts to get money.  Buying and selling the goods you got takes skill too.  Then you have to deliver on your promise to the customer in order to maintain your street cred.  Do you have what it takes to be a hustler?  I made this video to help others get ideas about reselling their thrift shop finds, not to simply to show off my abilities.  But damn I’m good.  No.  Hustling, making a video on it, and articulating ideas in an article is not for the lazy. Good money is earned.  My thoughts are free.  Check out the picked profit breakdown below.

Total Value and Asking price on thrifting haul:

1. Price is Right Wii game + $20

2. Tiger Woods 08 game + $25

3. Baby Einstein DVDs + $20

4. Batman CD Player + $45 (SOLD!)

5. Starbucks Tumbler + $20

6. Lion King Disney Mug + $20

7. Sony Walkman Radio + $40

8. Octopus Ring + $20 = $210

*Spent only $19!

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If you’re registered on WordPress, then please LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and SUBSCRIBE for other thrifting haul video productions and more adventures.  I’d love to hear about your favorite thrift store find, or biggest profit made from reselling items from Goodwill.  Happy hustling!

 

By Cameron McKirdy

This week I did something wild!  I pushed my limits, and enjoyed eight zip lines on the Oregon Coast in Warrenton.  I’d never attempted anything like this adventure.  It got my heart rate up, and made me scream to the top of my lungs.

Watch me zip down the fastest line there called Huckleberry on The Survival Bros YouTube Channel

What it’s like to jump from the top of the tower on an Extreme Zip Swing or Zwing with a 20 foot rope attached to the cable!

See my Bigfoot Sighting on Zip Line Over Water with Camera Drag

Enjoy a gallery of my photographs from my trip to High Life Adventures:

My tour group of eight people took around three hours to complete the course.  We had two local, and friendly guides.  They communicated with small radios attached to their harness.  One guide would go first, then use a rope to gently bring them to a controlled stop.  The female went last, and was responsible for securing us properly.  You don’t have to walk much in between the routes.  In fact, they have a 4×4 vehicle if you want to use it, or get spooked and need a ride back to the parking lot early.

Jumping from the observation tower is intense.  There are three different lines from that point, on two levels.  SPOILER ALERTS: You get a cookie and a juice box halfway through the tour, plus spring water.  Soon they will have a wood stove operational for the brutal winter months, and a wind turbine on top.  Also, be on the lookout for Sasquatch.  I just saved you a heart attack, and/or a lawsuit.  I threw a legit left jab to the face of the masked man, and nearly delivered a swift leg kick before realizing I wasn’t in danger.  Fortunately, when he sneaks up, you’re still locked to the zip line, and can’t fully attack!  

I would highly recommend going on this zip line tour.  It costs $99, and you can also try THE ZWING, their extreme zip swing.  I did, and got a high-visibility rubber bracelet as a souvenir.  The add-on is $29 more, but worth it, if you can keep down your cookie.  I was attached to a longer, 20-foot rope, and jumped off the side of the tower instead of from the middle like most of the group.  So I flew 40 feet across, and then dropped towards the lake, on the 1200′ long cable.  I screamed like Bigfoot, and was definitely the loudest in the group.  I look forward to zip lining again soon, and possibly filming even more.  Honestly, this would be a hard hobby to master.  The easiest way to stay facing forward is to hold your line towards the top of the connection.  

Visit High Life Adventures online by clicking through.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Stay tuned to the action Boss.High-Life-Zip-Line-Map

Each Zip Line is named after a native plant or tree

Starring Cameron McKirdy

Survival Bros gets 26 different free samples in his local Costco shopping center on HD video.  This total number doesn’t reflect when Cam swooped up multiple trial bites of the same item.  You’re allowed to take more than one, as long as it’s on the tray.  All of this complementary grub made a full meal, but he is still hungry.  Cam didn’t even purchase any stuff, and doesn’t have a Costco membership card.  Get access with a Costco Gift Card, then sample up, or buy an inexpensive meal at the food court deli.  

Try going at the end of the day for extra samples.  They are trying to get rid of the products before closing time.  What’s your favorite line from this production?  Leave a comment.  You can also subscribe at the top left to get free articles delivered to your email inbox.  Survival Bros doesn’t Spam, but we do store it just in case.  Mmmmm.  More crazy adventures coming on this blog.  Cheers.

Free Food Samples List:

1.  Cinnamon Rolls x 2

2.  Meat Balls with Frank’s Red Hot Sauce

3.  Buffalo Bites with Blue Cheese Dressing

4.  Unknown Baked Roll

5.   Sausage

6.  Doritos Chips

7.  Juice x 2

8.  Kielbasa Road Show Beef x 3

9.  Flavored Water x 3

10.  Pretzels with Cream Cheese Spread

11.  Chicken Salad

12.  Guacamole on Pita Bread

13.  Digestive Health Gummies

14.  Airborne Immune Supplements

15.  Whey Protein Drink

16.  Lentils and Rice

17.  Dave’s Killer Bread Cheese Sandwich

18.  Cherry Almond Cereal

19.  Veggie Patties

20.  Organic Pot Stickers

21.  Mini Tacos

22.  Egg Rolls

23.  Hot Sriracha Chicken Bites

24.  Soy Milk

25.  Trail Mix

26.  6 Layer Dip and Chips

Costco Card

Costco

out graphic pic

Check out http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com for a variety of comedy, and Art.

By Chris Miller

 

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Backpacking Gear for the Florida Trail

Usually I try to keep my pack weight down, though I don’t really consider myself an ultra light hiker. I can live comfortably out of a pack weighing no more than 20 pounds for months at a time. And that is including food and water. My base weight, the weight of my gear not including food and water, usually hovers around the ten pound mark, though I have a tendency to carry multiple paperbacks at a time which can push that weight up a bit.

So what’s in my pack?  Let’s start with what I consider the essentials, sleeping gear and clothing.
I sleep in a cheap Walmart $30 40 degree sleeping bag made by Ozark Trails. It is one of the smallest sleeping bags around which means it packs up into a very tight space. This is one of those occasions when you don’t need to spend a ton of money on a top of the line sleeping bag.  Is it warm enough? Probably not for a lot of winter activities, and even in Florida it can get cold in January. But the sleeping bag is always slipped inside my REI Minimalist Bivy. This adds a few degrees as well as allowing me to easily stealth camp. I also usually sleep in my Under Armour base layer.  My base layer is one of my most trusted pieces of survival equipment. I probably wouldn’t have survived the week of 20 degree nights stealth camping in Austin Texas that I went through a few years ago if it wasn’t for them and my winter hat and gloves. Also something which is always in my pack.
Other than that, a change of socks and underwear, my Petzl headlamp, a 5×7 tarp, a Thermarest Prolite sleeping pad, a Nike Storm Fit rain jacket, an REI Revelcloud packable jacket, a Sawyer mini water filter and a pair of what I call sleeping socks, socks which only get worn at night when I’m in my sleeping bag rounds out most of the rest of my gear.

Sure there are a few other things, random assorted things clipped inside my pack or stuffed in Ziploc bags near the top where they are easy to get to. The toilet paper and first aid kit, the mini Bic lighter and fire starter cubes. I also have a clip with several safety pins, a GSI plastic spoon, some rubber bands, a small set of nail clippers and a P-51 can opener.  You’ll notice that I didn’t mention a knife of any kind.  Airlines are pretty picky about letting you bring knives on board and I have found that when you are stealth camping in urban environments it is very likely that you will at some point be stopped by the police. Usually when I’m hiking I’ll carry a small Swiss Army knife. I’ve never needed anything more serious no matter the situation but have recently added a Buck Paklite Caper to my gear. Mostly for batoning wood for fires.  But for the Florida Trail I wasn’t able to pack a knife and in the rush before leaving I had failed to mail them ahead to myself. So I was without a knife in the swamps and back country of Florida.

Backpack Gear List

REI Lookout 40 backpack 53 oz
With 3 Liter Camelback water bladder and insulated drinking hose
Ozark Trail 40 degree synthetic mummy bag 32 oz
REI Minamalist Bivy 15 oz
Thermarest Prolite Small Sleeping pad 11 oz
Blue patched Silnylon 5×7 tarp with ropes 11 oz
Nike Storm Fit Rain Jacket 16 oz
Winter hat and gloves 3 oz
Underarmour bottoms lg 6 oz
Underarmour top xl 8 oz
REI Revelcloud Jacket md 12.5 oz
2 Extra Pair socks 6 oz
Petzl Headlamp w/batteries 3 oz
4 tent stakes w/stuff sack 2 oz
Sawyer Mini Water filter 2 oz
32oz Gatorade bottle 1 oz
Toiletries, First Aid Kit 8 oz
Notebook, Guidebook, Pens 32 oz
Swing Trek Umbrella 7 oz
Tent – Freestanding cheap Ebay tent 31 oz

259.5 oz or 16.2 Pounds

Much heavier than I’m normally used to and this is mostly because it is a new, heavier pack with the ability to not only carry more food but which also has a larger water carrying capacity. Florida is notorious for having bad tasting water which no amount of filtering or flavoring would cover and I wanted to be able to camel up when I found clear water.  Also, the cheap tent was a last minute add on. I wasn’t sure how I felt about sleeping in a bivy on the levees in Florida knowing that alligators were so close. As it was one of the hikers ahead of me woke up to the sound of one snoring next to their tent.  So how did the gear hold up?  Most of the gear are old standards that I’ve lived with for years so I knew what to expect. But there were a few newer items that hadn’t been extensively tested before.

Sawyer Mini Water Filter

The first was the Sawyer Mini water filter. Coming in at 2 oz I had used this on only one other two month long backpacking trip along the Oregon coast and it had held up well under the minimal water filtering I had done.  It comes with a squeeze bag for forcing water through the filter as well as a back flush syringe for cleaning out the filter when it becomes clogged. It has a 0.1-micron filter which means I never really have to worry about Giardia, e. coli or salmonella. And the best feature, at least for me, is the threaded end which can be screwed onto most soda and water bottles. This lets you fill your bottle from any source, screw on the filter and squirt the water directly into your mouth.

The biggest drawback, at least on hiking in the Florida swamps, was that the water often had enough silt suspended in it that I had to back flush the filter on an almost daily basis. I’ve heard this complaint from other hikers as well and they say for the slight difference in weight they carry the full Sawyer water filter which doesn’t seem to clog as easily.  This year the swamp was little on the dry side and at least one long stretch had very little in the way of drinkable water. Another hiker had gotten so low that he decided to drink his own urine. He turned around, filled up his Smartwater bottle, screwed on his Sawyer filter and shot a good healthy stream into his mouth.  “Hmm, still salty,” was his only response.  That’s because the Sawyer filters were not meant to filter the salt out of water. Just an FYI if you are thinking about drinking your own urine anytime soon.

Cheap Ebay Tent

I liked this tent mostly because it was freestanding and cost about $20 shipped directly from China.
The problem was that those also seemed to be the only good things about it.  The tent was listed by a few different Chinese Ebayer’s under titles like “Camping Tent Single Layer Waterproof Outdoor Portable UV-resistant Army green” or “Portable Camp Camping Tent Single Layer Waterproof Outdoor UV-resistant 1 Person.”  It was a one person tent that weighed just under two pounds and it could easily be stuffed in a side pouch or rolled up and strapped to the bottom of my pack. I wanted to make a few modifications to it to make it more camouflaged and perhaps add a rain flap over the zipper on the door but there wasn’t time before the trip.  It help up fine in decent weather and even light rain. That’s when I noticed that the floor wasn’t waterproof. This wasn’t a big deal until some of the heavier thunderstorms rolled in. Even though they lasted less than half an hour the wind would force the rain through the walls of the tent and I would end up sleeping in puddles for a while. Thankfully I had my bivy.  The storms also brought out another drawback of this tent. That the poles were weak. In the mornings I would notice that section after section of the poles were splitting and had to be repaired with Gorilla Tape.  But I was glad to have even this cheap tent to keep the hoardes of mosquitos at bay. Even then, sometimes just after sunset, the cloud of them would be so thick outside the tent that I thought they might be able to collectively break the flimsy tent and suck me dry.  Walmart used to sell a Junior Dome freestanding tent for about the same price that was only slightly heavier. It was meant for kids but I used that thing for years before passing it on to someone else. An act I sometimes regret as Walmart has discontinued their production.  Let’s just say that the cheap Chinese tent didn’t make it back from Florida.

No Cook

This hike I decided to go No Cook, meaning that I wouldn’t be packing my pot and stove and that I’d be eating everything cold.  For me this works out really well though I can understand how some people would prefer hot meals.  It meant that I’d never have to resupply fuel and I would have more room in my pack for food.  So what did I eat?  Bagels, cream cheese and sliced salami were most of my big meals. Protein shakes and Multi-Grain breakfast bars were usually my breakfasts and Snickers, Chia seeds and Little Debbie Cosmic Brownies were my snacks throughout the day.

Drinks, besides the protein drinks, were powdered Gatorade for the electrolytes and Crystal Light packets to flavor the water.  The big comfort food for me was the protein shakes. They have become a standard backpacking food for me. I carry about a pound of vanilla whey protein along with roughly the same amount of either non fat dry milk or Nido which is powdered whole milk. I prefer the Nido not only for the extra calories but because it doesn’t foam up as much when shaking the shake.  I make the shakes in my 32 oz Gatorade bottle, great because of its wide mouth. Usually I’ll drink some of the water off the top to make room for the powders. Personally I don’t measure what goes into the bottle. I’ll simply add a roughly equal amount of spoonfuls of powder, mixing it in gently at first to make room for more powder. When I think its ready I’ll just put the cap on and shake violently for a while.  The whey protein is great for repairing the damage to my muscles caused by hiking and generally this is just a tasty shake that I never seem to get sick of, which is pretty important in any foods you carry.  The only drawback was going through airport security. I was pulled aside for a security check and they emptied the contents of my food bag. When the TSA agent pushed everything aside he picked up the ziplock bags of what looked like kilos of cocaine. Luckily he laughed.  That doesn’t mean he didn’t swab down everything I owned looking for traces of drugs though.

All in all the gear held up well.  The tent though was left in a dumpster somewhere in Florida.  I’ll stick with the Sawyer Mini and I may start going No Cook on more of my travels.  The pack was a bit heavy for my tastes. Leaving the southern terminus of the Florida Trail I was carrying four liters of water, roughly 8 ½ pounds, more than I’ve ever carried before, and way too much food. I’ll probably go back to the 30 liter pack I usually use for the next adventure, which will probably be hitchhiking across the US.  And next time I go hiking in Florida I’ll probably pack some bug spray.

Hiking the Appalachian Trail on Amazon

@CleanshaveChris on Twitter

Chris Miller Videos on YouTube

Chris Miller Backpacker

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Cameron McKirdy from Survival Bros shows you how to gather freebies at a motel.  Embrace hoarding, and be the real prepper you can be.  Not that I’d do it, but I bet you could walk into any hotel and politely ask for another shampoo, soap, and coffee and you’d get hooked up without being questioned about what room you are staying in.  Just saying.  I’ve already put my freebies in Ziploc bags for storage.  Happy prepping.  Please SUBSCRIBE to Survival Bros on YouTube!  Thank you.