Posts Tagged ‘can’

Produced By Cameron and Kelvin of #survivalbros

Hey Friends,

Cam here.  Thanks for visiting my emergency preparedness blog.  We are pumping out a bunch of new videos this month, so I hope you like watching them.  Please share this quick informational production with friends.  Here’s the short link to copy and paste:  https://youtu.be/7O-KCu_Jqf4  This is important and fun stuff for preppers of all skill levels.  

We threw this kit together with gear items on hand that were laying around unused and therefore extra.  We have the basic survival necessities covered for the most part, but improvements can always be made.  I did notice there wasn’t an emergency blanket in this canister, and they can be purchased for $2.  However, if there’s a tsunami wave on the Oregon Coast, I like my odds of living.  I have kits like this one gallon cache, plus backpacks loaded with necessities, and bikes with racks placed strategically all over the Pacific Northwest. 

What’s your plan for safe escape from danger?  Stay healthy out there.  And keep your head on a swivel.  Few things are more valuable that situational awareness.  Cheers.

 

Created By Cameron McKirdy

Full product review of the COAST Products RX322 coming soon!  I had to post the HD video I created on this glorious snow day in the Pacific Northwest.   What would you like to see me slice through next?  

Coast Rapid Response KnivesCheck out the COAST Products Rapid Response knives at http://www.coastportland.com

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

Survival Bros Founder Cameron McKirdy digs up an emergency preparedness kit, and shows the contents.

Here’s when Survival Bros buried supplies in various waterproof containers all over town at high elevations.

Building small caches in case of a tsunami, or another disaster situation.

Survival Bros Logo Cool GreyThank you for visiting and supporting Survival Bros

By Cameron McKirdy

For my prep of the day I waterproofed gear. I rattle canned black panniers for my bug out bicycle, a frame bag, and my bike repair kit with the protectant. Then sprayed my clean Nike LunarGlide 4’s with one thick coat. I let them sit outside on a hot day, and now they are better than new. Broken in. Snug.

I need to swoop another can of protectant. Next I will waterproof my backpacking bags, and other cycling gear.

I may put another coat on these items tomorrow. As long as the shoe (article) is still breathable, and isn’t stained, I’m pouring on this type of protector, as pictured.

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Survival Bros Prep Of The Day – Waterproofing Gear

Saddle Mt Summit Photo

Ready or not, my chubby puggle Mocha was going hiking with me.  I took the pug/beagle combo to the top.  She made the summit by herself, but it was a struggle.  It was a sweltering 80 plus degrees out.  My poor dog hasn’t been training hard lately.  Her exercise routine consists of going from the couch to food and back.  But Mocha and I have hiked, so I knew the 5-year-old mutt still had it.  I remember the first time I let her off the leash on a trail.  She was running back and forth, up and down it.  The puggle was so excited to be out of the apartment.  I couldn’t contain her.  Once she even fell off a cliff as the bank eroded and I had to quickly swing her up by the leash and collar to save her.  Mocha is much fatter now, but we are working on it.

Mocha The Puggle

When we got to Saddle Mountain State Natural Area her nose was working overtime.  There were lots of people hitting the trail, and camping.  I brought water, and gave the puggle breaks.  I made her sit, and she would lay in the shade when she could.  The hike is 5 miles round trip,  but the elevation change is brutal. It’s 1603 feet to be exact, with the top at 3283 feet. Mainly I was concerned about her paws bleeding.  There is lots of metal fencing on the ground to contain the loose rocks, and I didn’t know if that would bother her.  On the way up I kept Moc on the leash, 1 because there’s cliffs, and 2 because lots of people were coming down the trail with dogs.  I wanted to protect her.  However, on the way down I decided it would be better to let her follow me off leash.  She didn’t want to walk on the trail because the gravel was hurting her.  So she waddled along side the main path, and didn’t hurt anything.  Plus, it was getting late, and we were basically the last down.

Mocha Survival Puggle

On the way we checked out a geocache hidden on a side trail.  I’ve found it before, but I wanted to see all the new stuff inside, and sign the log book again.  Not many people locate it each year.  I traded in a emergency paracord bracelet for a CD with clues to another cache.  I’m getting into geocaching because it’s something fun to do while hiking, or when you’re just out and about.  There’s more than 2 million geocaches planted around the world.  This hobby also forces me to analyze and use maps too.  I filmed Mocha and I checking out what was inside the ammo box this time.

After a few solid hours of hiking, Mocha, my cameraman, and I reached the peak.  We all sat down and took in the majestic views of the North Coast.  You can see the whole coastline, from Seaside well into Washington State.  Poor Mocha was beat.  She was gasping for air, and I was a little worried about her.  We had just enough water left to quench her thirst, but more would have been nice.  Usually there is a spring about halfway up that I feel is safe to drink from.  My dog did lap up the puddle there, but I wasn’t getting on all fours.  In the end, Mocha killed it.  I was so proud of her.  I kept her motivated with words of encouragement, smacking her butt, and tossing turkey jerky in her mouth.  On the way back I told Moc we were going back to the car and home for ice cubes (her fav).  My legs were jello, and Mocha was walking funny, but we accomplished the mission.  Next time we will be even stronger, and smarter about it.  

Cam and MochaMocha knew we were going to the top.  If you want to rock a paracord bracelet for emergency preparedness made by Survival Bros, send $8 to cameronmckirdy@hotmail.com via PayPal.  Thanks and best wishes from us both.

What’s good? Yesterday my peeps and I smashed Saddle Mountain. I’ve hiked the beast before. I’m local. This is what we discovered, including hidden treasure via geocache. Keep reading.

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Saddle Mountain photo by Cameron McKirdy

The park was popping. Crawling with life. We took our sweet time getting higher. I tracked our progress with the Nike+ GPS running app on my iPhone. Along the way, we found all sorts of shortcuts, and obscure trails. On one path we paused, only to spot a large ammo can hidden behind stacked rocks, under a rock formation.

Inside the treasure box was tons of toys, a logbook to sign, and even a riddle! We each left something in the box, and took a gift home. I got sticky hands!!! We didn’t even know there was a geocache on Saddle Mountain, but we found it. As for the riddle, we decided to listen to the Audio CD clues together, when we can find treasure again.

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Along the way we took a bunch of photos, and video. I will update this blog when the video is online. I recorded us opening the hidden treasure.

It felt great being blasted by the sun. Even though it was pretty windy, it was still warm. In total we hiked 5 miles. That’s from the parking lot, to the summit and back, with minor detours. According to the Nike+ GPS app we did it in 5 hours. I told ya we enjoyed the trip. Tourists would have gone faster, and missed more. More shenanigans soon from Survival Bros. Keep it real today.

– Cameron McKirdy
Survival Bros President

I finally painted my Mongoose mountain bike flat black. This blog covers how I painted it, and other preparations I’ve done to my End of the World transportation.

First I stripped my bike bare. I took off the back fender/rack, and the seat. I had to remove a LED light attached to my seat post. I also removed a bunch of stickers, and residue. Most came off after using Goof Off, lacquer thinner, and a flat razor blade. Once the surface was clean, I blasted it flat black with Rust-olium Universal all-surface spray paint. It’s an awesome product. You can shoot at any angle. It sticks to metal, plastic, wood, whatever, but costs almost $10 a can.

Next I rattle canned the frame. I did one side, then the other, and finally the bottom. I did two coats, so it took a few hours to paint it all and allow for drying. I painted the wheels and tires quickly also. Then I put it all back together.

To get an even coat I removed the cables, but had a problem getting them back on tight. The guys at Prom Bike Shop in Seaside OR helped adjust them. They know me so it was a free fix. I buy stuff there all the time, and trust them with all my repairs. This is the third time I’ve resurrected this bike, but she is looking good now. Good luck seeing me on this stealth flat black beast.

Painting my bike was easy. The hard part was not painting myself or the driveway. Now I can put some smaller packs on this bike, but I have another bicycle that can haul more. Hopefully I can get a trailer before the Apocalypse happens. This bike needs a light, plastic front fender soon. It will have a first aid kit, and emergency food onboard. There’s a bright light and black bell on the front as well for safety.

I also plan to make a motorized bicycle in the near future. I enjoy designing rat bikes that look like something out of the Mad Max movie. You gotta go flat black. It looks sick.

– Cameron McKirdy

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