Posts Tagged ‘forest’

By Cameron McKirdy

nudist at hot springs

I love meeting new friends at Terwilliger aka Cougar Hot Spring in Oregon.  It’s located in the Willamette National Forest, East of Eugene near the McKenzie River.  The cost is $6 for one day pass, or $60 annually per person.  You’ll take a moderate walk 1/2 a mile in from the parking lot, before getting to the meditative area.  Accommodations include a covered changing area, and two outdoor restrooms.  Keep in mind this is a day use area only.  You could face a fat fine if you’re not in the parking lot when darkness falls.

Along the creek skirting the blue pools, you can pull clay from Earth.  People paw the hillside.  Digging.  Nude (clothing optional).  We pass the clay globs around, and apply the potter’s mask to our face and body.  Working the raw material into pores, letting it dry on skin.  This pulls the toxins out.  Wash off in the scorching, lithium-blessed waters.   Exfoliated to your essence.  

indigenous nudity girls

Lovely ladies lounging on warm rocks in the Willamette National Forest of Oregon

By Cameron McKirdy – Survival Bros President

 I invite you to step up to the stump, and gather wood for fuel instead of buying it.  Let us know if you have completed this quest in the great outdoors.  Good luck!  Please SUBSCRIBE for more action, and HD videos on YouTube. Thanks for watching our exclusive content, only seen on #survivalbros

Note: More Survival Bros challenges coming in the near future.  See how many you can complete this summer.  Welcome a friend to play this survival game along with you.  Plus, if you have a video idea to suggest, email me at thesurvivalbros@gmail.com  Best wishes!

Screenshot of Cam challenging you to play

Cam camping at Mt. Hood Village RV Park and Resort in Oregon

By Cameron McKirdy

This week Survival Bros went hiking in the woods near Cannon Beach, Oregon to kill and eat a bunny.  We saw, but didn’t catch the animal, so we explored the forest near logging roads.  To my shock we stumbled upon a massive survival shelter made from tarps, logs, cordage, and more.  There was even a 4-person tent inside, and the shack had a clean tarp floor.  The place was loaded with camping gear, and everything you’d need to be self-sufficient in the outdoors for a long time.  Watch the HD video to see how it was built, and what’s stored on the site.  Join the Survival Bros community on YouTube, and SUBSCRIBE TODAY!  It’s free of charge.  

 

Best Tarp Shelter in Woods

The best tarp shelter we’ve ever seen in the woods

By Cameron McKirdy

I’m always challenging myself.  That’s why I decided hiking Saddle Mountain in Oregon on consecutive days would be a hardcore mission.  I camped out a night, took photos, cooked, and rested in the VW Vanagon often.  Besides achieving my goal, and reaching the summit back to back, I also met some cool people.  There’s so many beautiful girls from Portland that make this day hike, it’s ridiculous.  I gave them all a hard time about being tourists.  I’m from Seaside, a local, and don’t look so out of place.  

Take a look at the picture galleries I created for each day.  The wildflowers were exploding, and made the hike much more pleasant.  Plus, they gave me a chance to stop, breath, stretch, and take in their sweetness.  I also spent time creating a video of Humbug Mountain.  It offers a marvelous view point, and is only .2 miles off the main Saddle Mountain trail.  So are you up for the Survival Bros challenge?  Can you hike to the summit twice in two days, or maybe twice in one day?  Somebody will take me up on this.  Let us know.  Good luck!  Tons more soon, only on Survival Bros.

Day One Gallery

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 Day Two Hiking

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

My dad and I just got back to the Oregon Coast, after a 4 day trip playing on the McKenzie River and the trail. First we geared up, and hit the rapids with the Oregon Whitewater Association. A group of 70 extreme outdoor enthusiasts floated 14 miles down the river. The water was brutally cold, at only 47 degrees. I fell off our cataraft for the first time after we smashed into a log along the bank. I didn’t have time to be fearful. I was just trying to catch my breath from the shock of the water, and keep my legs up as I floated down. Of course, I had a class 3 life jacket on. I swam to the back of the boat, but didn’t like being where I couldn’t see the rocks ahead of me. Plus, I didn’t want to get trapped under the massive military grade raft. So I separated from the craft, and tried to swim to shore, but the water was moving too fast, and nobody there could help me. I swam to the side of the raft, and was barely able to climb back on. I had to quickly jump off the river bottom to boost myself up. I was fatigued, and just wanted to sit down and assess my injuries. I hit my knee on a rock, and bloodied by shin up. I was only in the river for a few minutes, but it wouldn’t have been long before my body started shutting down, and hypothermia set in. It was intense.

I had my iPhone 4S in my pocket with a LifeProof case on when I went overboard. It worked. No water got in thankfully. In my other pocket I was carrying the new Coast DX335 rescue knife. It stayed clipped on, but luckily I didn’t have to use it. You’d be surprised how many people die on the river getting tangled in ropes. Below is a funny clip I took with the LifeProof case on my cell. It took great video, and you can hear my dad yelling at me to put it away. He thought it was going to get splashed, or fall in as we hit the drop in the rapids. Also below is an HD video review of the Coast Products knife. I will update this blog as I get media online. I used my GoPro Hero 3 Black camera to record my treacherous mountain bike ride down the McKenzie River Trail. That will be up soon. Thanks for visiting Survival Bros. Follow us on Twitter, Youtube, and join the community on Facebook. Peace.

 

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

I shot this HD video while camping in the Olympic National Forest near Forks Washington.  It’s truly an amazing park.  You must visit.  I tented right near the river, and there’s plenty of challenging hiking trails nearby.  These elk were amazing, and quite noisy.  They were making all kinds of crazy calls.  I wanted to pet one.  Another part of me saw dinner. 

Yesterday I saw this amazing buck in Astoria OR. I grabbed the camera, and got right up to him. He walked my way. I thought it was about to go down! I would have won. Still, what a beautiful beast.
– Cameron McKirdy

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Survival Bros did it again. We mobbed to Fort Stevens State Park in Oregon to mushroom hunt. Its been wet, so this time provided way better results.

First, Shauna, Mac, and I explored the wooded area west of Coffenbury Lake. We discovered many types of fungi. We brought a book called, “Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest” and used our smart phones to help identify the shrooms as we went. By the lake we found mostly Mycena, and other mushrooms that aren’t good to eat. Look at the crazy orange one we found on a tree (top right). It’s a Pholiota flammans.

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After a few hours of rustling through the brush, we drove to the Peter Iredale shipwreck site to park. We walked to the Delora Dune Trail, and went north. This area is swampy, and packed with tall beach grass, and scotch broom. I started spotting medium sized, slimy brown mushrooms called Slippery Jack boletes. We collected around 130 of them in a few short hours. Later, it took a lot of work to clean them, and remove the sticky top of the cap for drying. The oven was on low all night.

Once again, we found a few edible pine spikes, and a handful of mica caps. We found so many varieties, we are still comparing pictures, and taking spore prints to identify them. Out of the edible ones we know, and dried, my buddy Mac plans on making a mushroom seasoning mix for cooking. We’ve already tried the boletes in a barley pilaf dish, that included dried chanterelles found previously on a golf course.

I also found a large Amanita muscaria, or Fly Agaric! That was a treat. They are so beautiful, warts and all. Of course they are poisonous, so get to know the family. Here’s a quick video of what we found on the hunt. We used Coast Knives from Portland Oregon to cut, and clean the mushrooms.

HD video of Survival Bros finding and cutting a few mushrooms to take home.

Anytime I’m outdoors now, I’m mushroom hunting. This area near the Columbia River is ideal for many desirable species. I hope this blog helps. Survival Bros will continue to share our experiences here, so visit often. Thanks!
– Cameron McKirdy

What’s good? Yesterday my peeps and I smashed Saddle Mountain. I’ve hiked the beast before. I’m local. This is what we discovered, including hidden treasure via geocache. Keep reading.

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Saddle Mountain photo by Cameron McKirdy

The park was popping. Crawling with life. We took our sweet time getting higher. I tracked our progress with the Nike+ GPS running app on my iPhone. Along the way, we found all sorts of shortcuts, and obscure trails. On one path we paused, only to spot a large ammo can hidden behind stacked rocks, under a rock formation.

Inside the treasure box was tons of toys, a logbook to sign, and even a riddle! We each left something in the box, and took a gift home. I got sticky hands!!! We didn’t even know there was a geocache on Saddle Mountain, but we found it. As for the riddle, we decided to listen to the Audio CD clues together, when we can find treasure again.

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Along the way we took a bunch of photos, and video. I will update this blog when the video is online. I recorded us opening the hidden treasure.

It felt great being blasted by the sun. Even though it was pretty windy, it was still warm. In total we hiked 5 miles. That’s from the parking lot, to the summit and back, with minor detours. According to the Nike+ GPS app we did it in 5 hours. I told ya we enjoyed the trip. Tourists would have gone faster, and missed more. More shenanigans soon from Survival Bros. Keep it real today.

– Cameron McKirdy
Survival Bros President

Cameron from Survival Bros fills up his thermos with amazing spring water. This stop is along Highway 26, East of the rest areas coming from Seaside. Check it out! It’s our favorite watering hole. There’s not many spring water sources around. People come from all over for the good stuff. Beats city water.

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