Posts Tagged ‘trees’

By Cam The Cuddler

Watch this HD video, and try meditating with Survival Bros at the McMinnville COOP’s Labyrinth and Gardens.  Presented by Parkview Community Center.  Here’s the address: 325 NE Burnett Rd McMinnville, OR 97128  

A labyrinth is reflective space where you can notice changes in your thinking.  Perhaps you can look at a situation, and see it in a new light.  Find a labyrinth using this locator website.  Tell #SurvivalBros what you think about these amazing works of Art.  Combining both the best of Philosophy and Nature.  

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Cameron McKirdy takes another selfie

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A deer eats and apple under a tree in the park

Please comment, like, share, and SUBSCRIBE!  Thanks for watching our HD video productions.  Have a peaceful day.  More on http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Cameron McKirdy drives his vehicle, a 1986 Volkswagen Vangon in gross, extremely dangerous Winter weather conditions near the beach in Seaside, Oregon.  

Survival Bros Tips for driving in rain:

  1.  Turn your lights on
  2.  Obey traffic laws
  3.  Allow extra time and distance between yourself and other cars
  4.  Have good windshield wiper blades and/or Rain-X the front
  5. Take your time (go slower), plus let people in (merge), and people to cross the road
  6. Avoid distractions like filming, texting while driving, and singing to music in your car

Please try NOT to soaking pedestrians with enormous puddles near sidewalks!

More on http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com  Please show your support for our #vlog and SUBSCRIBE now on YouTube!  Cheers from #survivalbros #preppers

driving in rain

Water on the road and windshield clearly reduce visibility while driving

By Cameron McKirdy – Survival Bros President

 I invite you to step up to the stump, and gather wood for fuel instead of buying it.  Let us know if you have completed this quest in the great outdoors.  Good luck!  Please SUBSCRIBE for more action, and HD videos on YouTube. Thanks for watching our exclusive content, only seen on #survivalbros

Note: More Survival Bros challenges coming in the near future.  See how many you can complete this summer.  Welcome a friend to play this survival game along with you.  Plus, if you have a video idea to suggest, email me at thesurvivalbros@gmail.com  Best wishes!

Screenshot of Cam challenging you to play

Cam camping at Mt. Hood Village RV Park and Resort in Oregon

By Cameron McKirdy

This week I did something wild!  I pushed my limits, and enjoyed eight zip lines on the Oregon Coast in Warrenton.  I’d never attempted anything like this adventure.  It got my heart rate up, and made me scream to the top of my lungs.

Watch me zip down the fastest line there called Huckleberry on The Survival Bros YouTube Channel

What it’s like to jump from the top of the tower on an Extreme Zip Swing or Zwing with a 20 foot rope attached to the cable!

See my Bigfoot Sighting on Zip Line Over Water with Camera Drag

Enjoy a gallery of my photographs from my trip to High Life Adventures:

My tour group of eight people took around three hours to complete the course.  We had two local, and friendly guides.  They communicated with small radios attached to their harness.  One guide would go first, then use a rope to gently bring them to a controlled stop.  The female went last, and was responsible for securing us properly.  You don’t have to walk much in between the routes.  In fact, they have a 4×4 vehicle if you want to use it, or get spooked and need a ride back to the parking lot early.

Jumping from the observation tower is intense.  There are three different lines from that point, on two levels.  SPOILER ALERTS: You get a cookie and a juice box halfway through the tour, plus spring water.  Soon they will have a wood stove operational for the brutal winter months, and a wind turbine on top.  Also, be on the lookout for Sasquatch.  I just saved you a heart attack, and/or a lawsuit.  I threw a legit left jab to the face of the masked man, and nearly delivered a swift leg kick before realizing I wasn’t in danger.  Fortunately, when he sneaks up, you’re still locked to the zip line, and can’t fully attack!  

I would highly recommend going on this zip line tour.  It costs $99, and you can also try THE ZWING, their extreme zip swing.  I did, and got a high-visibility rubber bracelet as a souvenir.  The add-on is $29 more, but worth it, if you can keep down your cookie.  I was attached to a longer, 20-foot rope, and jumped off the side of the tower instead of from the middle like most of the group.  So I flew 40 feet across, and then dropped towards the lake, on the 1200′ long cable.  I screamed like Bigfoot, and was definitely the loudest in the group.  I look forward to zip lining again soon, and possibly filming even more.  Honestly, this would be a hard hobby to master.  The easiest way to stay facing forward is to hold your line towards the top of the connection.  

Visit High Life Adventures online by clicking through.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Stay tuned to the action Boss.High-Life-Zip-Line-Map

Each Zip Line is named after a native plant or tree

By Cameron McKirdy

This week Survival Bros went hiking in the woods near Cannon Beach, Oregon to kill and eat a bunny.  We saw, but didn’t catch the animal, so we explored the forest near logging roads.  To my shock we stumbled upon a massive survival shelter made from tarps, logs, cordage, and more.  There was even a 4-person tent inside, and the shack had a clean tarp floor.  The place was loaded with camping gear, and everything you’d need to be self-sufficient in the outdoors for a long time.  Watch the HD video to see how it was built, and what’s stored on the site.  Join the Survival Bros community on YouTube, and SUBSCRIBE TODAY!  It’s free of charge.  

 

Best Tarp Shelter in Woods

The best tarp shelter we’ve ever seen in the woods

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

This weekend Survival Bros went for a drive up I-5, and then took Spirit Lake Highway to visit majestic Mount St. Helens.  Most of the hiking trails were off limits to us because we had a puppy to acclimate to the outdoors for the first time.  Therefore, we found ourselves at Seaquest State Park, which while splendid, doesn’t have well-maintained paths like the nearby Hummocks Trail closer to the volcano.  So, after breaking a sweat there we continued to climb in elevation, and drove to two breathtaking viewpoints called Elk Rock, and Castle Lake.  I shot the HD video above, and snapped a few pictures.  Our final stop was Clearwater Lake.  It formed after the eruption in 1980.  There’s a relatively flat trail circling the body of water, but again no dogs are allowed.  I was willing to risk a minimum $50 fine, but we’ll just have to trek it another time.  Besides, the sun was setting, and my belly was growling.  At Castle Rock we cruised into C and L Burger Bar for a feast.  I’m talking peanut butter real ice cream milk shakes, fatty elk cheeseburgers, and scalding crinkle cut french fries.  Epic.  It was a complete day, and I look forward to returning to Mount St. Helens when it’s warmer, and all the backpacking trails are open to explore.

Mount St. Helens lookout

Clearwater Lake Washington

c and l burger shake

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

The first nasty storm of the season is underway on the Oregon Coast.  The wind is bending trees, and flooding is a possibility.  I’m surprised the power is still on.  Seaside, OR is expected to have gusts up to 80 miles per hour!  Have a survival kit together, and an emergency plan for your family.  Here’s a checklist of supplies to gather just in case of a disaster.

– Water (A gallon per person per day for a minimum of 3 days.)

– Fuel AKA gas for cooking, and dry wood for fire

– Food (Stores could close for days without electricity.  Don’t buy perishable goods that need to be refrigerated.  Think fruit.)

– Candles

– Flashlights and headlamps with fresh batteries

– Blankets

– Shelter (It’s probably a good idea to stay inside, so you don’t get wet and sick.)

– Emergency Weather Radio

– Toys for kids, and treats for pets, because they will be scared in a super storm

– First Aid

– Gas (Fill up your vehicle in case there’s a rush for fuel, and you can’t get some later.)

– Books (Maybe ones on emergency planning.  We don’t want you to lose your mind without TV.)

– Whistle to signal for help

– Multi-tool and Wrench to turn off water, etc.

– Moist wipes, and garbage bags for sanitation and personal hygiene

– Local maps

– Manual Can Opener

– Generator and/or solar charger for electrical devices

– Cash/Silver/Barter Items

– Rain Gear/Warm clothes

– Prescription Medications

– Lighter and waterproof matches

– Paper and Pen for notes, and more checklists

– Communications: Cell Phones with chargers, and two-way radios

With all or most of these things you should be good to go, and ready for a super storm bringing flooding.  If you can think of any other handy items, please leave your suggestions in the comment section.  Thanks, and wish us Oregonians good luck this weekend.  It’s
going to be a wild one.  Peace and love from Survival Bros. 

Here’s a link to the live webcam in Seaside, OR on The Lanai at The Cove so you can checkout the current conditions.

There’s no flooding on Highway 101 right now, but high tide isn’t until this evening.

seaside odot cam

seaside odot floodingIt looks like Highway 101 is starting to flood!  Be careful out there.

Survival Bros just got this blade from Coast Products. It’s badass. One side of the handle features a G10 grip, the other is bare metal. It has a heavy-duty frame lock. The knife isn’t going anywhere in the locked position. The PX350 has a fatty blade, and functional thumb stud. And as you can see, it can cut down trees. Don’t feel bad. Oregon is full of them. More on this Coast knife soon! http://www.coastportland.com

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By Cameron McKirdy

Season’s greetings!  On Christmas Eve my Dad and I hiked from Indian Beach in Ecola State Park to the Hiker’s Camp on Tillamook Head.  We checked out the abandoned World War 2 bunkers, and the viewpoints too.  Pops split, leaving me to spend the night by myself.  In this HD video I show you the trail, my gear, and my fire.  I also cooked up some Goulash thanks to my new flameless cookwear system by Trekmates.  Enjoy the video.  After a two hour nap, I decided to back to Seaside in the dark night.  It was crazy.  I used a glow stick, and my Coast HP14 flashlight to luminate the path.  A recent storm kicked tons of massive trees down.  I had to climb over many, with my 40 pound pack on.  I booked it from the cabins, and got back to Seaside in just over 2 hours, covering 4 gnarly miles of ground.  It was an intense op.  I lost the trail briefly once, slightly rolled an ankle, and nearly slipped down a steep bank.  It was one of the most rewarding, and challenging adventures of my life.  Next, I plan to raft the Nehalem river this weekend.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  I’d appreciate your comments, and likes.  %^).

Indian Beach photo P1000380

(Survival Bros)
We did it. My dad and I drove from Redmond OR into the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness, and backpacked to Pamelia Lake. Here’s what I know.

The hike in was unforgettable. The trail ran along a creek most of the way. We got there late afternoon, but the thick forest sheltered us from the Sun. The trail to the lake is perfect. A little rocky, but easy. There’s campsites all along Pamelia Lake. We scouted around and found flat ground near the water. There weren’t mosquitos earlier, but they are buzzing now. Where’s all the dragonflies to regulate?

I’d take a picture of our loaner two-person tent, but it doesn’t look right. It must be missing some rods. I have to get a one-person tent. How am I supposed to get a good nights rest with an old man snoring in my face?

There’s several water sources within earshot. I’m going to fill up the bottles, and my hydration pack later. My Dad’s been boiling his water, and using an Aquamira filter attached to his hydration pack, courtesy of Survival Bros. I don’t want to wait for my water to cool down, so I’m using Aquamira tablets, or drinking it straight from the source. I packed in aloe vera juice, coconut water, and yerba mate too.

Tomorrow we go hard, and pack light as we trek 16 miles in a big loop. We’ll take Hunt’s Creek Trail up to The Pacific Crest Trail. I’m wearing Nike ACG boots VS my Vibrams, because we will be plowing through some snow fields. That’s where a few people got lost just yesterday. It’s not well marked, and the hiker’s footprints melt. However, we have the map I’m holding, an internal compass, and a good gut feeling.

There’s all sorts of wildlife here. Ducks, snakes, beatles, bears, frogs, and birds. There’s millions of skinny trees reaching. They are so thick, it’s mind boggling. Pamelia Lake is a gem. You’re missing a ferocious sunset, as pictured below. This is one of the nicest lakes I’ve ever stayed at. It’s certainly the most private. Minus the bugs. My friends.

My advice, make sure to travel in front of people with gas! My dad has been blowing up the trail. Sorry, butt payback is gonna be brutal. Really, you can’t avoid my dad’s gas. The wind are always changing.

The forecast for tomorrow calls for more odor. We just split a freeze dried Mountain House Beef Stew. Dad described it as kinda chewy. True. Still, nothing satisfies like a warm meal. In the morning we carb load on granola and oatmeal.

There’s an ounce of daylight left. My bed is made. I like my new regular sized, Kelty self-inflating sleeping mat. It’s good when your in a small area for a short time. I can’t wait to take my boots off and lay down. We just found out were NOT in a designated camping site, but it’s too late to move tonight. Maybe we’ll relocate tomorrow.

(Day 2 on lake)
We just got back to camp on Pamelia Lake. We left around 8:30 am, and it’s now almost 6:30. What a day! Both my Dad and I set personal bests, going 16 plus miles on foot. I set the pace. When we took breaks I stretched, so I don’t think I will be very sore in the morning.

Approximately 300 people backpack the full Pacific Crest Trail each year. Most brave enough to attempt the feat give up. This hike is no joke. We did just a small part, but I got a great sense of what it would take to go all the way. We met three hikers set on going the distance. They were friendly, and took the time to answer my dads million questions, and compare maps. Props to anyone hard enough to do the full PCT, from Mexico to Canada. It takes months, not counting all the preparations.

To get from the lake to PCT we took Hunt’s Creek Trail. It was overgrown, and wet. The climb was intense, but we took breaks to grub, fill up our water containers, and explore. I ate mostly fruit bars, nuts, seeds, and turkey jerky. Thank God for Starbucks instant coffee.

I took lots of great photos today. We passed maybe a dozen lakes around Mount Jefferson. On the way I got caught in countless spider webs. I ended up with a fair amount of bites, maybe 25, but I didn’t have to resort to Deet thankfully. I’d defiantly hike the PCT again. I can’t wait to show the bros this spot. I want to party up where all the crystal clear lakes are. Nobody’s around! There is still patches of snow in some areas, but I used it to cool off. I kept rubbing the icy snow into my hair, and even laid on it once. Dad thought I was crazy. Duh.

I just jumped in Pamelia Lake for the first time! Refreshing. It’s so cold though. I would have skinny dipped, but we have a neighbor tonight. Now I’m laying down after making another Mountain House meal. This time I toured Italy, and scarfed lasagna with meat. It was way better than the beef stew.

Dad wants to build a fire tonight. Sounds like a lot of work, and it’s still warm outside, but it’s been a few months since I’ve built one. I’m game. We may hike more of the PCT tomorrow, but this is our last night on the lake. I’m also planning on mountain biking the nearby McKenzie River Trail. It’s one of Oregon’s finest. Another update from our road trip coming pronto! Peace peeps.

Cameron McKirdy

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