Posts Tagged ‘wood’

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

I’ve been managing Cougar Crossing Campground in The Willamette National Forest, while living in my Volkswagen Vanagon.  Plus, running Terwilliger Hot Spring in Oregon.  That has kept me busy enough, but with Spring and Summer, come baby making, and mice are no exception.  I have assassinated 18 mice in three weeks, using this Five Gallon Bucket Peanut Butter Trap, and a few traditional spring loaded wooden Victor Brand weapons.   Watch the HD Survival Bros Video Production below to see exactly how to build your own mouse deathtrap.  

Keep the critters out of your house, and vehicle by using this hunting method.  It’s a simple, and easy solution, to a disgusting problem.  I hate killing anything living, but NOW they won’t be damaging my car, tent, etc. and eating my food!  I lost a few Pop Tarts folks.  To make this project at home:

1. Spread Peanut Butter around the inside edge of the large plastic bucket, just down from lip

2.  Place stick running up to the top, overhanging so the mice fall inside after looking for a meal

3.  Fill bucket with 3 – 4 inches of water

4.  Wait overnight for animals to become trapped, and die

5.  Dispose of dead rodents properly with gloves, bury if possible a foot underground

Don’t call me PETA.  I love animals, and drowning is a peaceful way to go right?  Continue reading for more helpful information about mouse removal and solutions from personal experience.

I asked around for more mice control tips and tricks, and here’s what my friends came up with.  Rats dislike pure mint oil extract.  Place a few drops on a cotton ball, and put it where you’ve seen animals to keep them out.  Also, try putting dryer sheets in the holes of your car or house.  The mice won’t want to pass through these smelly spots.  Steel wool (not thin) set in car air vents is a deterrent too, allegedly.  Play with these things if you have a rodent issue.  I think it’s good stuff to know, so I’m taking the time to share for my fellow Survival Bros.

Manager's Campground Spot #1 on The McKenzie River

Manager’s Campground Spot #1 on The McKenzie River

The most mice I’ve captured in a night was four!  They are getting thinned out quick, but I expect them in waves all Summer.  I also decapitated some poor, innocent slugs, when they set off the lever on my traps.  It takes time setting up multiple devices.  I’ve spent 30 minutes many nights smearing peanut butter, and setting them in all the right spots.  Which for me, would be small game trails, near holes, or by my vehicle.  In addition, a pal told me dumping sugar away from your camping spot will keep various critters out of your outdoor gear.

You can also try low tech scare tactics on the mice.  When I first heard them scampering around my Vanagon, I didn’t have traps in place.  So I make a bunch of intimidating noises.  I was hissing, growling, barking, and clapping.  That didn’t work, and neither did playing music.  I should have tried Nickelback.  Shaking the van side to side wasn’t and effective deterrent either.  The mice are too smart.  I swear they are tuned into my brain waves, and attack my living quarters as soon as I start to fall asleep.

1986 Volkswagen Vanagon GL Vandwelling Project for Survival Bros

1986 Volkswagen Vanagon GL Vandwelling Project for Survival Bros

Later I peed on my rig to make it seem like a big animal lives there, and to serve as a warning.  If I wasn’t deathly allergic to evil cats, I’d get one to stand watch.  Where’s an owl when you need one?  I have tried it all folks.  And the 5 gallon peanut butter bucket trap as seen HERE works best.  Good luck.  More soon.  Please comment, like, and share this blog post with friends.  You’re the best.

Owl Kills Squirrel and Poses for Cameron McKirdy's Camera http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com

Owl Kills Squirrel and Poses for Cameron McKirdy’s Camera

Check out http://www.CameronMcKirdy.com for more Art, Video, and Fun! 

 

 

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By Andrew McKirdy
Whiskey Barrel TablesUpcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value.
 
This DIY project started when I sat down for a drink at Rock Bottom Brewery in Denver, Colorado.  I noticed several old whiskey barrels being used for decoration.  I asked my waitress if I could have one, and a few days later the brewmaster and I were loading two freshly used barrels into a borrowed car for transport.   They’d been emptied, but I could still hear swishing when I moved them.  One had been used for a raspberry saison and the other for an ale.  I don’t have a shop, but thankfully a friend let me use his patio to begin work.  I decided I wanted to keep one barrel whole and use it as a kitchen table.  The other I would cut in half and turn into two side tables.  I used a handsaw for accuracy, and finished with a powered skill saw.  For the whole barrel, I drilled a small opening in the bottom to drain the remaining contents.  I scraped the insides with a chisel, removing any loose wood chips.  Then I poured vinegar in the barrels to kill bacteria and prevent future growth.  This also helped get rid of the funky raspberry smell. 
 
I sanded, then dusted off both barrels, to prep them for stain.  I came back the next day, but the stench of high VOCs (nasty chemicals called volatile organic compounds) reeked.  I realized I would need to seal them up.  This would stop the smell, and provide an excellent sheen.  I found a low VOC polyurethane which worked wonders.  Lastly, were the rusty metal hoops, which I wanted black.  After those were painted I priced around for the most affordable glass company.  I was told I needed a tempered piece of glass which cost twice as much, but is infinitely safer and stronger.  Finally the project was complete.  I had taken something that was going to be destroyed, and given it new life in my home.  I researched the name on the barrel and found out it came from the oldest and smallest distillery in Kentucky, originating in 1797.  The Woodford Distillery is in fact a National Historic Landmark.  I have a real piece of Americana.
Vintage Oak BarrelsOak Whiskey Barrels to be upcycled

Created By Cameron McKirdy

Full product review of the COAST Products RX322 coming soon!  I had to post the HD video I created on this glorious snow day in the Pacific Northwest.   What would you like to see me slice through next?  

Coast Rapid Response KnivesCheck out the COAST Products Rapid Response knives at http://www.coastportland.com

Survival Bros just got this blade from Coast Products. It’s badass. One side of the handle features a G10 grip, the other is bare metal. It has a heavy-duty frame lock. The knife isn’t going anywhere in the locked position. The PX350 has a fatty blade, and functional thumb stud. And as you can see, it can cut down trees. Don’t feel bad. Oregon is full of them. More on this Coast knife soon! http://www.coastportland.com

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By Cameron McKirdy
Last week I traded an antique wooden chest for a bunch of used Swiss Army knives. I kept some, and swapped out others for a new Buck folder.

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They call this classic the Buck Stockman. I liked it because it has three fatty blades. It’s nothing special, but it will do work. The knife dealer in my town said it was made in China, so it’s not the best quality, compaired to Buck knives made in America. But I will use this folder. The blades on the mini Victorinox tools don’t have much of a surface to work with. They are perfect for the small emergency caches I’ve been burying. All in all, I made a good trade up. The knife dealer pays out half of the retail value of the item. Makes sense. It’s fair to me.

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I swooped these old knives from an estate sale today. I paid a little too much. $10. I offered $5, but got rejected. I forked it over because it was for a good cause. I should still be able to make a few bucks on these, or trade up later. I’d like another multitool for them. I’m really digging these older knifes with wood handles, so I may keep the large one. The little folding knife was designed to work with a pocket watch. You can see where it would attached to a chain.

I’m hooked on collecting knives. I can’t wait for next weekend so I can hit up more garage sales. The time to buy is when people have to sell. Buying used is way more fun that paying full retail for something. I like that these objects have a history, and I get to add to it. Peace and love.

Today I met up with an old friend interested in trading pocket knifes, for my antique wooden chest. I’ve been packing this cool, big box around for years, but felt like swapping it out for smaller items I can potentially trade or sell later.

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I got this ornate chest in Tigard, OR at a St. Vincent De Pauls for $40 or so. I was going to restore it, but liked the rough, vintage look, and couldn’t bring myself to refinish the wood. I never cleaned the tin exterior either. It made a great shoe box for awhile, but I had my eye on a stash of Swiss Army knives my buddy acquired from an estate sale. We are both hustlers, so I felt like meeting to get some deals going.

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I picked these 18 multitools out of my friend’s collection. I will end up putting a few in small emergency caches to be buried. Some will be gifts, and others I will use for odd jobs. A couple have lights built in too. It felt good to trade for items that won’t be a burden to move. I’m always traveling, so bulk is bad. I will do more deals with this contact, and the possibilities are endless with online networking. Don’t miss out. Be social.