Posts Tagged ‘dinner’

By Andrew McKirdy
Whiskey Barrel TablesUpcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value.
 
This DIY project started when I sat down for a drink at Rock Bottom Brewery in Denver, Colorado.  I noticed several old whiskey barrels being used for decoration.  I asked my waitress if I could have one, and a few days later the brewmaster and I were loading two freshly used barrels into a borrowed car for transport.   They’d been emptied, but I could still hear swishing when I moved them.  One had been used for a raspberry saison and the other for an ale.  I don’t have a shop, but thankfully a friend let me use his patio to begin work.  I decided I wanted to keep one barrel whole and use it as a kitchen table.  The other I would cut in half and turn into two side tables.  I used a handsaw for accuracy, and finished with a powered skill saw.  For the whole barrel, I drilled a small opening in the bottom to drain the remaining contents.  I scraped the insides with a chisel, removing any loose wood chips.  Then I poured vinegar in the barrels to kill bacteria and prevent future growth.  This also helped get rid of the funky raspberry smell. 
 
I sanded, then dusted off both barrels, to prep them for stain.  I came back the next day, but the stench of high VOCs (nasty chemicals called volatile organic compounds) reeked.  I realized I would need to seal them up.  This would stop the smell, and provide an excellent sheen.  I found a low VOC polyurethane which worked wonders.  Lastly, were the rusty metal hoops, which I wanted black.  After those were painted I priced around for the most affordable glass company.  I was told I needed a tempered piece of glass which cost twice as much, but is infinitely safer and stronger.  Finally the project was complete.  I had taken something that was going to be destroyed, and given it new life in my home.  I researched the name on the barrel and found out it came from the oldest and smallest distillery in Kentucky, originating in 1797.  The Woodford Distillery is in fact a National Historic Landmark.  I have a real piece of Americana.
Vintage Oak BarrelsOak Whiskey Barrels to be upcycled
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PRODUCED BY CAMERON McKIRDY

WARNING – BLOG IS GRAPHIC, AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN.

Survivalism is hardcore. Man has to eat. My bro Tactical Gypsy took matters into his own hands, and seized an opportunity yesterday, killing a wild rabbit and cooking it on a beach bonfire in Oregon. He’s on the Paleo diet, and needs lots of protein to stay lean and healthy. He popped the furry friend with his Glock 40 upon first sight. One bullet put it down. Roger never knew what hit him.

dead bunny rabbit rogerNext, Tactical Gypsy had to clean the cottontail rabbit with the knife shown above. He also removed the cute little feet. It took about 45 minutes to smoke on the fire with some PBR baste. It’s a hearty meal for at least two. To cut up wood, the survivalist and former Marine battoned wood into small chunks with the Coast Products FX350. He is proud to rock this knife as part of this every day carry or EDC. It’s held up remarkably well, considering the tremendous beating Survival Bros has put on it. Great work demonstrating your ability to be self-sufficient Tactical Gypsy. Thanks for the story and picture. Survival Bros salutes you.

If you would like to share a story, photo, or idea with Cameron McKirdy at Survival Bros, please email thesurvivalbros@gmail.com. You’re awesome.

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My bro and I created the dankest bacon elk chili ever! It didn’t last long. We took elk steak hunted locally in the Saddle Mountain Hunting Unit near Cannon Beach, and combined it with bacon ends, and 2 cans of beef chili.

For spices we put in a pinch of paprika, garlic, salt, and cayenne pepper. We had the crispy bacon simmering in Pabst beer. The chili sat on low, covered. The elk was cut into small 1/2 inch squares. Plus, we had to make corn bread as a side.

The result was a hearty meal, that had heat. It was spicy, and smoky. If only we had king bolete mushrooms to add. We saved the bacon fat for other elk cooking adventures. Talk about real grub.

Yesterday I saw this amazing buck in Astoria OR. I grabbed the camera, and got right up to him. He walked my way. I thought it was about to go down! I would have won. Still, what a beautiful beast.
– Cameron McKirdy

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OMG!  We created a legendary sauce with bacon ends and bits, Hot Jimmy Dean sausage, ground beef, fire roasted tomatoes, tomato paste, Newman’s Own organic tomato sauce, and an egg.  I added red pepper flakes, garlic and onion powder, and freshly ground black pepper.  It doesn’t get any better.  Unless you pick up a loaf of soft, buttery, garlic bread, which we did.  There was no room for a salad on my plate.  This was an EXTREME dinner.  In fact, we made enough for a few extra meals.  Thumb up the HD video montage, and please subscribe to Survival Bros on Youtube.  Thanks for watching.  You’re awesome!

– Cameron McKirdy

http://www.youtube.com/user/survivalbros

By Cameron McKirdy
My buddy stopped by today with pockets full of raw mushrooms from the forest in our backyard. He shared his amazing, fresh chanterelles, and chicken of the woods mushrooms. You gotta try these flavorful fungi.

First we cleaned the chanterelles, then dried them. After dicing them up, they went into a pan on low heat. We sautéed them in butter, and a little organic sunflower oil. Next we added minced, fresh garlic. The shrooms were amazing like that.

This was my first taste of chantrelle mushrooms. I was surprised by the rich, spicy flavor. It lingered on the tounge. Very yummy. They are orangish, funnel-shaped, with wavy caps. Chanterelles are known for being rich in vitamin C, D, and potassium too.

Chanterelles are hard to find in the Pacific Northwest. My hommie found a pound of them on his elk bow hunting trip. I’m hooked now. I’m going to find some, and dry them for future meals. I could even sell them to local restaurants. These edible mushrooms are truly a delicacy.

After we lightly cooked the chantrelles we mixed them in turkey chili, with black pepper. It was so good. I savored every bite. It was a five star feast. Thankfully I have friends that share. %^].

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