Posts Tagged ‘Cameron’

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CAM CUDDLES – AS SEEN ON GOOD DAY OREGON AND FOX 12 NEWS KPTV PORTLAND:

Since Cuddle Up To Me launched in 2013, hundreds of people from around the world came to our area to try it. Now Professional Cuddler Samantha Hess is trying to meet everyone’s cuddling needs. She recently hired her first male cuddler known as Cam Cuddles. The 32 year old lives in Seaside and is a former art major from the University of Oregon.

Facebook.com/camcuddles
Twitter.com/camcuddler
Instragram.com/camcuddles

Cam Cuddles on YouTube – SUBSCRIBE TODAY

Book an Appointment with Cam Here!

Read more: http://www.kptv.com/Clip/12348741/cuddle-business-hires-male-cuddler#ixzz45jLZpFIf

Source: Cuddle business hires male cuddler

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Produced By Cameron McKirdy

Check out the kitty bum camp on The Columbia River in Astoria, Oregon.  Somebody is taking good care of these homeless animals, but I doubt it’s the city.  Survival Bros hasn’t seen anything like this before.  We just said hi, and didn’t disturb them.  What a view the cats have.  Lucky.

astoria oregon signThe Astoria Oregon Welcome Sign

 

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

The first nasty storm of the season is underway on the Oregon Coast.  The wind is bending trees, and flooding is a possibility.  I’m surprised the power is still on.  Seaside, OR is expected to have gusts up to 80 miles per hour!  Have a survival kit together, and an emergency plan for your family.  Here’s a checklist of supplies to gather just in case of a disaster.

– Water (A gallon per person per day for a minimum of 3 days.)

– Fuel AKA gas for cooking, and dry wood for fire

– Food (Stores could close for days without electricity.  Don’t buy perishable goods that need to be refrigerated.  Think fruit.)

– Candles

– Flashlights and headlamps with fresh batteries

– Blankets

– Shelter (It’s probably a good idea to stay inside, so you don’t get wet and sick.)

– Emergency Weather Radio

– Toys for kids, and treats for pets, because they will be scared in a super storm

– First Aid

– Gas (Fill up your vehicle in case there’s a rush for fuel, and you can’t get some later.)

– Books (Maybe ones on emergency planning.  We don’t want you to lose your mind without TV.)

– Whistle to signal for help

– Multi-tool and Wrench to turn off water, etc.

– Moist wipes, and garbage bags for sanitation and personal hygiene

– Local maps

– Manual Can Opener

– Generator and/or solar charger for electrical devices

– Cash/Silver/Barter Items

– Rain Gear/Warm clothes

– Prescription Medications

– Lighter and waterproof matches

– Paper and Pen for notes, and more checklists

– Communications: Cell Phones with chargers, and two-way radios

With all or most of these things you should be good to go, and ready for a super storm bringing flooding.  If you can think of any other handy items, please leave your suggestions in the comment section.  Thanks, and wish us Oregonians good luck this weekend.  It’s
going to be a wild one.  Peace and love from Survival Bros. 

Here’s a link to the live webcam in Seaside, OR on The Lanai at The Cove so you can checkout the current conditions.

There’s no flooding on Highway 101 right now, but high tide isn’t until this evening.

seaside odot cam

seaside odot floodingIt looks like Highway 101 is starting to flood!  Be careful out there.

Cameron McKirdy produced this new Survival Bros IT’S EPIC Youtube channel trailer.

Saddle Mt Summit Photo

Ready or not, my chubby puggle Mocha was going hiking with me.  I took the pug/beagle combo to the top.  She made the summit by herself, but it was a struggle.  It was a sweltering 80 plus degrees out.  My poor dog hasn’t been training hard lately.  Her exercise routine consists of going from the couch to food and back.  But Mocha and I have hiked, so I knew the 5-year-old mutt still had it.  I remember the first time I let her off the leash on a trail.  She was running back and forth, up and down it.  The puggle was so excited to be out of the apartment.  I couldn’t contain her.  Once she even fell off a cliff as the bank eroded and I had to quickly swing her up by the leash and collar to save her.  Mocha is much fatter now, but we are working on it.

Mocha The Puggle

When we got to Saddle Mountain State Natural Area her nose was working overtime.  There were lots of people hitting the trail, and camping.  I brought water, and gave the puggle breaks.  I made her sit, and she would lay in the shade when she could.  The hike is 5 miles round trip,  but the elevation change is brutal. It’s 1603 feet to be exact, with the top at 3283 feet. Mainly I was concerned about her paws bleeding.  There is lots of metal fencing on the ground to contain the loose rocks, and I didn’t know if that would bother her.  On the way up I kept Moc on the leash, 1 because there’s cliffs, and 2 because lots of people were coming down the trail with dogs.  I wanted to protect her.  However, on the way down I decided it would be better to let her follow me off leash.  She didn’t want to walk on the trail because the gravel was hurting her.  So she waddled along side the main path, and didn’t hurt anything.  Plus, it was getting late, and we were basically the last down.

Mocha Survival Puggle

On the way we checked out a geocache hidden on a side trail.  I’ve found it before, but I wanted to see all the new stuff inside, and sign the log book again.  Not many people locate it each year.  I traded in a emergency paracord bracelet for a CD with clues to another cache.  I’m getting into geocaching because it’s something fun to do while hiking, or when you’re just out and about.  There’s more than 2 million geocaches planted around the world.  This hobby also forces me to analyze and use maps too.  I filmed Mocha and I checking out what was inside the ammo box this time.

After a few solid hours of hiking, Mocha, my cameraman, and I reached the peak.  We all sat down and took in the majestic views of the North Coast.  You can see the whole coastline, from Seaside well into Washington State.  Poor Mocha was beat.  She was gasping for air, and I was a little worried about her.  We had just enough water left to quench her thirst, but more would have been nice.  Usually there is a spring about halfway up that I feel is safe to drink from.  My dog did lap up the puddle there, but I wasn’t getting on all fours.  In the end, Mocha killed it.  I was so proud of her.  I kept her motivated with words of encouragement, smacking her butt, and tossing turkey jerky in her mouth.  On the way back I told Moc we were going back to the car and home for ice cubes (her fav).  My legs were jello, and Mocha was walking funny, but we accomplished the mission.  Next time we will be even stronger, and smarter about it.  

Cam and MochaMocha knew we were going to the top.  If you want to rock a paracord bracelet for emergency preparedness made by Survival Bros, send $8 to cameronmckirdy@hotmail.com via PayPal.  Thanks and best wishes from us both.

Produced By Cam McKirdy

In this HD video clip I relieve pressure on my foot.  These big blisters were the result of an 18 mile hike on The Ramona Falls Loop and The Pacific Crest Trail.  I should have busted out the Moleskin as soon as it started hurting, but I didn’t think they would develop so quickly, and puff up like this.  If your blisters are huge, there’s nothing wrong with poking into them with a sterile knife or needle.  You can sterilize your tools by cleaning them with alcohol, a lighter, or boiling them in hot water.  It’s also a good idea to soak the wound in Epsom salts for up to 30 minutes.  Plus, apply an antibacterial cream like Neosporin before covering with a bandage.  Clean the area twice daily if possible too.  Prevention is key.  Wear thick socks, and break in your hiking boots long before you hit the trail.  

survival bros logoDisclaimer:  Information provided on the Survival Bros blog is for entertainment purposes.  Do what’s right for you.

PRODUCED BY CAMERON McKIRDY

WARNING – BLOG IS GRAPHIC, AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN.

Survivalism is hardcore. Man has to eat. My bro Tactical Gypsy took matters into his own hands, and seized an opportunity yesterday, killing a wild rabbit and cooking it on a beach bonfire in Oregon. He’s on the Paleo diet, and needs lots of protein to stay lean and healthy. He popped the furry friend with his Glock 40 upon first sight. One bullet put it down. Roger never knew what hit him.

dead bunny rabbit rogerNext, Tactical Gypsy had to clean the cottontail rabbit with the knife shown above. He also removed the cute little feet. It took about 45 minutes to smoke on the fire with some PBR baste. It’s a hearty meal for at least two. To cut up wood, the survivalist and former Marine battoned wood into small chunks with the Coast Products FX350. He is proud to rock this knife as part of this every day carry or EDC. It’s held up remarkably well, considering the tremendous beating Survival Bros has put on it. Great work demonstrating your ability to be self-sufficient Tactical Gypsy. Thanks for the story and picture. Survival Bros salutes you.

If you would like to share a story, photo, or idea with Cameron McKirdy at Survival Bros, please email thesurvivalbros@gmail.com. You’re awesome.

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By Cameron McKirdy

What’s good friends? I had to give you a quick update on my new Specialized Road bike. It’s a work in progress. I just picked it up from Goodwill, and started modifying it. First, I had the back wheel straightened, brakes adjusted, and new black handlebar grips put on. Next I attached a front light, back rack with pannier bags, a seat pack, and a black Specialized brand bottle holder. Plus, I acquired a bicycle repair kit, complete with mini tire pump, a set of tools, and more. I have a cargo net that can lockdown even more survival gear on top of the rack. Now I’m ready for the zombie apocalypse!

Check out the HD video clip I shot, and let me know how you would modify this ride. I plan on adding a handle bar bag, bell, rear LED lights, toe clips on the pedals, a B.O.B. Yak one-wheeled cargo trailer, and a computer for mileage, etc. I’m not spray painting this one. I like the odd color combo. I want to be highly visible on the road, so I will add 3M reflectors and wear them too. This bike is ideal for taking on long trips, and camping. I love every second riding this emergency preparedness vehicle. It’s fast. Enjoy the pictures.

Specialized Allez Sport 1994

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Update: I put new bags on my Allez. Now I can carry more gear. I will shoot another video when the packs are fully loaded, and I feel like this project is complete.

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

My dad and I just got back to the Oregon Coast, after a 4 day trip playing on the McKenzie River and the trail. First we geared up, and hit the rapids with the Oregon Whitewater Association. A group of 70 extreme outdoor enthusiasts floated 14 miles down the river. The water was brutally cold, at only 47 degrees. I fell off our cataraft for the first time after we smashed into a log along the bank. I didn’t have time to be fearful. I was just trying to catch my breath from the shock of the water, and keep my legs up as I floated down. Of course, I had a class 3 life jacket on. I swam to the back of the boat, but didn’t like being where I couldn’t see the rocks ahead of me. Plus, I didn’t want to get trapped under the massive military grade raft. So I separated from the craft, and tried to swim to shore, but the water was moving too fast, and nobody there could help me. I swam to the side of the raft, and was barely able to climb back on. I had to quickly jump off the river bottom to boost myself up. I was fatigued, and just wanted to sit down and assess my injuries. I hit my knee on a rock, and bloodied by shin up. I was only in the river for a few minutes, but it wouldn’t have been long before my body started shutting down, and hypothermia set in. It was intense.

I had my iPhone 4S in my pocket with a LifeProof case on when I went overboard. It worked. No water got in thankfully. In my other pocket I was carrying the new Coast DX335 rescue knife. It stayed clipped on, but luckily I didn’t have to use it. You’d be surprised how many people die on the river getting tangled in ropes. Below is a funny clip I took with the LifeProof case on my cell. It took great video, and you can hear my dad yelling at me to put it away. He thought it was going to get splashed, or fall in as we hit the drop in the rapids. Also below is an HD video review of the Coast Products knife. I will update this blog as I get media online. I used my GoPro Hero 3 Black camera to record my treacherous mountain bike ride down the McKenzie River Trail. That will be up soon. Thanks for visiting Survival Bros. Follow us on Twitter, Youtube, and join the community on Facebook. Peace.

 

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

When you are in the field, your gear has to work.  That’s why I pack the best in my bag.  I’ve been testing both the Dukjug, and H2O Lite bottles from GSI Outdoors, featured in the HD video review above.  I hiked out to Cape Falcon in Oswald West State Park.  This Oregon State Park is wondrous, with vast ocean views, and wide waterfalls.  The trail was muddy though, but I live to get dirty.  It’s 2.10 miles to Cape Falcon from the parking lot on Highway 101.  So it took about 45 minutes to get to where I filmed the product review.

The Dukjug is my favorite bottle.  It’s stainless steel, and holds 1 liter.  The design is fun, and colorful.  It’s covered in peace signs, and funky tye dye, so this container fits my hippie personality.  GSI Outdoors makes other designs of this jug too, and even a plastic version, all of which are BPA-free.  Their Dukjug is unique, because it stores duct tape under the rubber band on the outside.  Of course every prepper should have extra tape on hand just in case.  I’d use this bottle for hot liquids, and mixing up drinks, like instant coffee or tea.  It has a wide lid, so you can store anything inside, even food.  The Dukjug tips the scales at 10.1 oz, and retails for $19.95.  That’s a value, because unless you drop it off a cliff, it will last a lifetime.

The H2O Lite is super handy to have around.  It’s collapsible, and weighs next to nothing, only 0.9 oz.  I can just roll it up, and shove it in my backpack.  It takes up virtually no space.  I like that you can write on it, and date it.  Plus, it has a cool cap so it doesn’t leak.  When you want a cold drink, just pop the top, and squirt it in your pie hole.  Graduations are marked on the back too, which could help with cooking when you need to use a precise amount of water.  GSI Outdoors makes smaller versions as well.  I would want to bring one of those on my shorter day trips when I’m going ultralight.  If you need quality camping gear, look no further than this American company.  They have a huge product line you have to check out.  More reviews soon.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog.  Peace and love.Cam @ Cape Falcon