Posts Tagged ‘extreme’

By Cameron McKirdy

In these HD #survivalbros videos I source product, or pick stuff, to potentially resell at a profit.  I purchased nearly 27 pounds of Goodwill donations at 99 cents per lb in one day, as seen in the first vlog below.  Watch these guides to learn more about picking, aka hustling.  I chose a diverse range of merchandise, buying everything from purses to Nintendo Wii video games.  I think I scored on my thrifting haul adventure, but you  be the judge.  SUBSCRIBE TO SURVIVAL BROS ON YOUTUBE HERE to join the conversation.  Thanks for watching.     

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Cam found Minion Goggles at The Bins in Portland, Oregon

Pro Tips for  Shopping at The Goodwill Outlet Bins:

  1. Wear gloves.  This way you can toss stuff, and protect your hands from sharp objects…
  2. Weigh your cart several times to see where your at, and to preview what you may spend.
  3. Take a chance on an item or two that you know nothing about.  It may prove to be a super find.

More advice coming in blog articles soon…..

 

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By Cameron McKirdy

This week I did something wild!  I pushed my limits, and enjoyed eight zip lines on the Oregon Coast in Warrenton.  I’d never attempted anything like this adventure.  It got my heart rate up, and made me scream to the top of my lungs.

Watch me zip down the fastest line there called Huckleberry on The Survival Bros YouTube Channel

What it’s like to jump from the top of the tower on an Extreme Zip Swing or Zwing with a 20 foot rope attached to the cable!

See my Bigfoot Sighting on Zip Line Over Water with Camera Drag

Enjoy a gallery of my photographs from my trip to High Life Adventures:

My tour group of eight people took around three hours to complete the course.  We had two local, and friendly guides.  They communicated with small radios attached to their harness.  One guide would go first, then use a rope to gently bring them to a controlled stop.  The female went last, and was responsible for securing us properly.  You don’t have to walk much in between the routes.  In fact, they have a 4×4 vehicle if you want to use it, or get spooked and need a ride back to the parking lot early.

Jumping from the observation tower is intense.  There are three different lines from that point, on two levels.  SPOILER ALERTS: You get a cookie and a juice box halfway through the tour, plus spring water.  Soon they will have a wood stove operational for the brutal winter months, and a wind turbine on top.  Also, be on the lookout for Sasquatch.  I just saved you a heart attack, and/or a lawsuit.  I threw a legit left jab to the face of the masked man, and nearly delivered a swift leg kick before realizing I wasn’t in danger.  Fortunately, when he sneaks up, you’re still locked to the zip line, and can’t fully attack!  

I would highly recommend going on this zip line tour.  It costs $99, and you can also try THE ZWING, their extreme zip swing.  I did, and got a high-visibility rubber bracelet as a souvenir.  The add-on is $29 more, but worth it, if you can keep down your cookie.  I was attached to a longer, 20-foot rope, and jumped off the side of the tower instead of from the middle like most of the group.  So I flew 40 feet across, and then dropped towards the lake, on the 1200′ long cable.  I screamed like Bigfoot, and was definitely the loudest in the group.  I look forward to zip lining again soon, and possibly filming even more.  Honestly, this would be a hard hobby to master.  The easiest way to stay facing forward is to hold your line towards the top of the connection.  

Visit High Life Adventures online by clicking through.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Stay tuned to the action Boss.High-Life-Zip-Line-Map

Each Zip Line is named after a native plant or tree

By Cameron McKirdy

Click the shortlink here to view it on the Survival Bros YouTube Channel:  https://youtu.be/HaIbx0UvPR0

Check out Seattle Fire Dept.’s custom Medic One rescue bicycle created to help people overcome adversity during a survival type situation, or basic injury outdoors.  Like this cycling setup?  What else would you put on this bike frame to carry items?  Comment below.   Thanks to the Seattle Fire Department for taking the time to educate, and assist the gracious public.  The Fremont Solstice Fair is a spectacular event.  Mark your calendars for this celebration next year.  

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL, LIKE, COMMENT, AND SHARE this HD video production from #SurvivalBros

Seattle Fire Dept. Medic One Bike

Photo of Seattle Fire Dept’s Medic One Response Bicycle Loaded with Emergency Preparedness Gear

 

By Cameron McKirdy

 Mitsubishi Fuso FG 140 4×4 truck spotted in Seaside, Oregon!  This emergency preparedness rig has an ideal setup for extreme mobile living, and protection from undead zombies among us.  Would you car camp in this monster?  It looks comfortable, and well designed.  It may be bigger than I’d want for bugging out, and I don’t know about the color, but it’s an excellent truck platform to work from.  The Fuso just needs a snorkel if it’s going to spend the winter on the Oregon Coast.  I didn’t see a camera system installed either for extra security.

This beast looks like a completely custom job, made to be multi-purpose.  There’s few places it couldn’t go on Earth.  I’d love to hear what you have to say about this setup in the comment section, or on our YouTube channel.  I’m sure this vehicle will be on the road for a long time, baring an unforeseen marauders, or natural disasters, etc.  Please SUBSCRIBE to Survival Bros by entering your email on the top left side of the screen!  Stay tuned for more emergency preparedness news, because you can’t know what’s around the corner.

Additional HD videos and blog posts can be found on http://www.cameronmckirdy.com  Thanks for your support.

Mitsubishi Zombie TruckA Zombie Aapocalypse Edition 4×4 truck parked in Seaside, Oregon

 

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

One of the most popular every day carry knives is the Kershaw Chive designed by Ken Onion.  This sly blade features the patented SpeedSafe assisted opening, giving it a remarkable feel.  In the HD video I put the knife to the test, slicing a can, plastic bottle, different types of cordage, and much more.  On Youtube I couldn’t find anyone doing a legit cut test with the Chive, so I made an extreme one.

I was genuinely surprised to see that the Kershaw didn’t dull after cutting the soda can.  I muscled through the bottom, and I was sure it would damage the blade, or at least scratch the titanium-oxide rainbow coating.  But even after that, I was able to shave off a good chunk of arm hair in a few strokes.  The knife did everything I wanted it to, making it a perfect EDC tool.  It’s ultra lightweight too, at only 1.7 ounces.  

The Chive comes in a wide variety of colors, some with different handle materials, but the Rainbow version is the most expensive.  There’s nothing girly about it.  The wild coating reminds me of an oil slick, which are always interesting to look at.  I like the stepped thumb studs, because they are rigid, making the small 1 15/16″ blade easy to open.  However, I prefer to use the flipper on the back, because I feel it’s a little safer, and there’s no chance of slicing my thumb on deployment.  It does have a solid tip-lock system for safety, so the knife won’t open when you pull it out of your pocket.  In addition, I love the long, sturdy pocket clip.  It’s not rainbow, just polished steel with the Kershaw logo etched down it.  Plus, the jimping on the top of the blade gives you more control, which is good because the Chive is small, and somewhat slick due to the coating.

At the end of the day, the Kershaw Chive is a legend.  Trust me, you want one.  It makes a great keychain knife, and if you carry it on you, you’ll use it daily.  For additional tech specs, and to view other models, visit http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/  Thanks for visiting and supporting Survival Bros – your emergency preparedness blog.  Comments, likes, and shares are appreciated.  What knife would you like me to test next, and what should I destroy with it?  Peace.

rainbowchive_1600vib_1The Kershaw Rainbow Chive – Model 1600VIB

My survival keychain video starring The Chive

Popping Blisters with the small knife after hiking on the PCT

Produced By Cameron McKirdy with Tactical Gypsy

Homeless.  That’s what we were.  My bro and I stayed on this boat for weeks last summer to avoid paying rent, and getting a regular job.  We were free, and so was our lodging.  But with that comes less.  We had to deal with a lot of crap.  It’s noisy in the Skipanon and Warrenton Oregon Marina.  Sleeping is challenging.  People work on boats at all hours, so there’s usually people clamoring, and trucks hauling.

skipanon marina oregon

Skipanon Warrenton Oregon Marina at Night

Once we had to stay on the boat right after our host varnished the interior.  We opened the craft up, but the stench was still awful.  I got a headache, and while grateful for the place to lay down, I was ready to split and catch the bus into town.  In the HD video above we got a solid fire going, but I didn’t film the smoke that filled the cabin, and it was horrible.  I got a headache from that too.  Again, we lifted the lid on the boat, and opened up the ceiling, but sacrificed warmth.  The Survival Bros slept on a wet mattress because the boat had recently sank.

We had a key to the shower and restroom, but that was a hike from the boat.  Plus, we didn’t want to get hassled by security, so we kept our creeping to a minimum, and laid low.  The smart move was to pee in plastic bottles to avoid detection.  However, the other fisherman on the marina were typically very helpful.  We had their assistance many times when we had to do work on the boat, or move it to another slip.  Speaking of, the rent for a spot there is only $70 per month, and our buddy paid that.  You have to pay a little more for electricity, but it’s still the cheapest place to crash in town.  In exchange for a bed, Tactical Gypsy worked on the boat, making sure the bilge was pumping out water, or whatever.  I kept him company, and learned what I could from the Maritime Scientist.  It was an adventure for sure, and I’m happy to share it with you.  More homelessness tales soon.  Thanks for supporting Survival Bros.  Peace and love.

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Selling waterlogged boat motors for cash

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

My dad and I just got back to the Oregon Coast, after a 4 day trip playing on the McKenzie River and the trail. First we geared up, and hit the rapids with the Oregon Whitewater Association. A group of 70 extreme outdoor enthusiasts floated 14 miles down the river. The water was brutally cold, at only 47 degrees. I fell off our cataraft for the first time after we smashed into a log along the bank. I didn’t have time to be fearful. I was just trying to catch my breath from the shock of the water, and keep my legs up as I floated down. Of course, I had a class 3 life jacket on. I swam to the back of the boat, but didn’t like being where I couldn’t see the rocks ahead of me. Plus, I didn’t want to get trapped under the massive military grade raft. So I separated from the craft, and tried to swim to shore, but the water was moving too fast, and nobody there could help me. I swam to the side of the raft, and was barely able to climb back on. I had to quickly jump off the river bottom to boost myself up. I was fatigued, and just wanted to sit down and assess my injuries. I hit my knee on a rock, and bloodied by shin up. I was only in the river for a few minutes, but it wouldn’t have been long before my body started shutting down, and hypothermia set in. It was intense.

I had my iPhone 4S in my pocket with a LifeProof case on when I went overboard. It worked. No water got in thankfully. In my other pocket I was carrying the new Coast DX335 rescue knife. It stayed clipped on, but luckily I didn’t have to use it. You’d be surprised how many people die on the river getting tangled in ropes. Below is a funny clip I took with the LifeProof case on my cell. It took great video, and you can hear my dad yelling at me to put it away. He thought it was going to get splashed, or fall in as we hit the drop in the rapids. Also below is an HD video review of the Coast Products knife. I will update this blog as I get media online. I used my GoPro Hero 3 Black camera to record my treacherous mountain bike ride down the McKenzie River Trail. That will be up soon. Thanks for visiting Survival Bros. Follow us on Twitter, Youtube, and join the community on Facebook. Peace.

 

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

You’re off the grid, but you need power. That’s when you wish you invested in a solar panel charger, like the Solarmonkey from Powertraveller that I tested in the HD video above.

If I’m alone in the woods, it’s nice to know my cell phone has power just in case. That’s why the Solarmonkey Adventurer comes with. If I fall off a cliff, having my iPhone handy sure beats a whistle. Powertraveller has created a huge variety of solar chargers, excellent for any job. From small ones that can give your phone a boost, to large solar panels that can keep your laptop running. I like the Solarmonkey Adventurer because it’s a great size for backpacking, and mountain biking.

The powerful internal lithium polymer battery is 2500mAh, and will charge fully in 12 hours or less. Plus, you can charge the battery, and a device at the same time, saving time.  And it can plug into a wall, or DC outlet.  I was shocked at how fast it charges my phone. The system is lightweight too, tipping the scales at only 9.3 ounces.  The dimensions are 6.6 x 3.7 x 0.8 inches.

It comes with many tips to be compatible for your device, and a heavy-duty “Monkeytail” cable made just for Apple products. The neoprene case it comes in is durable also. It will keep the solar panels safe, and secure. A carabiner is included. I use that often so it can just hang off my bag. As I mentioned in the video review, the panels are shock and water-resistant. It outlasted me pouring water on it while charging, and surprisingly worked after I froze it. The Solarmonkey Adventurer from Powertraveller is badass. I can easily recommend it to my friends.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Come back soon.solarmonkey-adventurer-5

This was a wild trip.  My Dad and I had been scouting the river, and planning the ride down the Nehalem river for months.  He read all he could find on the dangers, and decided to try floating from a higher point at Spruce Run.  After pumping the 14 foot cataraft up, we got it loaded on the trailer, and headed south past Cannon Beach on Highway 101.  Our friend Steve tagged along.  He knows the Nehalem well, and has been fishing for Steelhead on it for years.  We used his rig to shuttle us back to the trailer, and drag the raft up a steep bank at Beaver Slide after traveling 13.3 miles.

This journey didn’t go exactly as planned.  We unhooked the raft too soon, and it fell off the trailer when we were backing it up to the water.  After that mishap, we picked it up by hand, and got her wet.  It was a smooth ride at first, but early into the excursion we lost an oar lock.  Thankfully, Pops was wise enough to have an extra on hand.  Without the oar lock, we would have lost an oar and been screwed.  I had a great time chatting with the boys, and relaxing.  We were also trying to locate a lost dog, that had a $2500 reward for information resulting in his rescue.  No luck on that.  We did however see a coyote, fish, and a bald eagle. 

cataraft on river

Hauling the massive raft on the custom trailer

The Nehalem got rougher, and more dangerous as we got lower on the river.  The water was freezing, and we were wet.  I had a wetsuit, booties, and gloves to stay warm.  On a quick stop I used the spring water I collected to make Mountain House spaghetti with my Jetboil Zip camping stove.  Steve and I warmed our hands on the hot bag as the food cooked.  Near the end of our unexpected journey we ran into more trouble.  We got hung up on a boulder, and spun around.  Then at Salmonberry Drop we got blasted by a 7 foot wave, and my camera went out.  You gotta watch the video in 720p HD.  It was a hell of an adventure.  We got out alive, but not without a little suffering.  We won’t be rafting the Nehalem again soon.

Here’s a fun video I made of the first time my Dad and I rafted the lower part of the Nehalem River. 

OMG!  We created a legendary sauce with bacon ends and bits, Hot Jimmy Dean sausage, ground beef, fire roasted tomatoes, tomato paste, Newman’s Own organic tomato sauce, and an egg.  I added red pepper flakes, garlic and onion powder, and freshly ground black pepper.  It doesn’t get any better.  Unless you pick up a loaf of soft, buttery, garlic bread, which we did.  There was no room for a salad on my plate.  This was an EXTREME dinner.  In fact, we made enough for a few extra meals.  Thumb up the HD video montage, and please subscribe to Survival Bros on Youtube.  Thanks for watching.  You’re awesome!

– Cameron McKirdy

http://www.youtube.com/user/survivalbros