Posts Tagged ‘drop’

By Cameron McKirdy

I performed a “Stress Test” on the new Coast Products HP17TAC flashlight just to see if she could survive.  The light is impact, and water resistant, so I threw it on the pavement from a moving car, ran it over, and then soaked it.  Amazingly, the light was just as bright after I put the hurt on it, and all of the functions still worked.  It boasts 615 lumens on high, and also has a useful strobe mode for signaling and defense, plus a low mode to conserve energy.

hp17 specs

The HP17TAC looks aggressive, and it is mean.  It’s built to take punishment, with a thick aluminum casing that is heavily knurled.  Meaning, there’s plenty of texture on the black body to maintain grip in any scenario.  I like the thickness (1.53 inch body), and I prefer longer flashlights (13.12 inches) like this so I have seeing power in total darkness.  This Coast product runs off three AAA batteries that are included, with a lengthy run time of 15 hours and 15 minutes on high.  That’s incredible.  How’s the tactical light look now?  Here’s a picture of the cosmetic damage.  Not bad considering!COAST hp17tac damage

According to their website, “Coast’s Pure Beam Focusing Optic System with Fingertip Speed Focus Control provides superior beam consistency from spot to flood, with no dark rings typically associated with focusing flashlights, and you can lock the beam focus in any position you want with our Beam Lock System.”  I found this to be true in my series of stress tests.  You can use just one finger to change the beam, making it fast, and easy to use.  Plus, as you can see in the video, changing position was smooth even after trying to get sand into the bezel.   This is a tactical flashlight you’d be proud to own, and something you’d likely use often.  It’s lightweight, durable, powerful, and with three modes of operation it will provide the best visibility for you in a given situation.  It looks badass too, even more so after you break it in like I did.  Visit COAST Products for more info on the HP17TAC and other useful gear.  

hp17 tactical flashlightThe COAST Product HPT17TAC is Survival Bros tested and approved!

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By Cameron McKirdy

In this HD video I drop my new LG G2 and Ballistic SG phone cover on gravel, then concrete from 6 ft high!  I just got this smartphone, so I was terrified it would break.  However, I know there’s fellow geeks out there that want to see Survival Bros stress test all kinds of gear, so I went for it.  The Ballistic case worked well, but after taking off the cover I did notice a tiny dent on the rim of my LG G2.  It’s purely cosmetic, and I can live with it, because my screen did not crack.  Of course I would have preferred no damage, which I expected since it’s rated to six feet according to the manufacturer.  The minuscule chip isn’t worth taking a picture of, and I’m pleased with my purchase overall.  Therefore, I give it 4 out of 5 Stars.  It’s still probably the best case out there for this recently released Android device, so until better cases are produced it’s staying on me as one of my everyday carry items.  Have you had any experience with Ballistic Cases?  Let us know.  Thanks.

On a side note: I dropped this phone with the case on a few weeks back from about four feet up, and after all of my contacts had been erased!  It was the strangest thing.  My emails, and phone numbers never returned, and I didn’t delete them.  Please comment on this blog post if something similar has happened to you.

ballistic shell gel caseFor all the tech specs here’s the Ballistic website.  Visit Survival Bros again soon.

lifeproof case

Watch Cam torture test a new LifeProof 4/4S iPhone case at Willow Grove in Longview, Washington. This product stood up to the beating, and protected the phone extremely well. It’s truly waterproof. For all the tech specs, and to buy your own case, visit LifeProof, and see the difference. They will even ship it to you for free. You’ll love owning a LifeProof case.

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

This was a wild trip.  My Dad and I had been scouting the river, and planning the ride down the Nehalem river for months.  He read all he could find on the dangers, and decided to try floating from a higher point at Spruce Run.  After pumping the 14 foot cataraft up, we got it loaded on the trailer, and headed south past Cannon Beach on Highway 101.  Our friend Steve tagged along.  He knows the Nehalem well, and has been fishing for Steelhead on it for years.  We used his rig to shuttle us back to the trailer, and drag the raft up a steep bank at Beaver Slide after traveling 13.3 miles.

This journey didn’t go exactly as planned.  We unhooked the raft too soon, and it fell off the trailer when we were backing it up to the water.  After that mishap, we picked it up by hand, and got her wet.  It was a smooth ride at first, but early into the excursion we lost an oar lock.  Thankfully, Pops was wise enough to have an extra on hand.  Without the oar lock, we would have lost an oar and been screwed.  I had a great time chatting with the boys, and relaxing.  We were also trying to locate a lost dog, that had a $2500 reward for information resulting in his rescue.  No luck on that.  We did however see a coyote, fish, and a bald eagle. 

cataraft on river

Hauling the massive raft on the custom trailer

The Nehalem got rougher, and more dangerous as we got lower on the river.  The water was freezing, and we were wet.  I had a wetsuit, booties, and gloves to stay warm.  On a quick stop I used the spring water I collected to make Mountain House spaghetti with my Jetboil Zip camping stove.  Steve and I warmed our hands on the hot bag as the food cooked.  Near the end of our unexpected journey we ran into more trouble.  We got hung up on a boulder, and spun around.  Then at Salmonberry Drop we got blasted by a 7 foot wave, and my camera went out.  You gotta watch the video in 720p HD.  It was a hell of an adventure.  We got out alive, but not without a little suffering.  We won’t be rafting the Nehalem again soon.

Here’s a fun video I made of the first time my Dad and I rafted the lower part of the Nehalem River.