Posts Tagged ‘lost’

By Cameron McKirdy in Seaside, OR

Are you a natural scavenger like me?  I often dream about prepping for disasters by roaming the streets, searching for anything I can use; pens, paperclips, tape, food, water, First Aid supplies.   It’s crazy how much people in America through away.  Lots of items in the trash are still good, another man’s treasure.

I made a pit stop at Goodwin Park at 1172 Necanicum, on the corner of 12th in Seaside, Oregon.  When I got out of my Volkswagen Vanagon, I noticed I had rolled over eight AAA, and AA batteries.  So I did the natural thing, and busted out my HD camera for a vlog rant.  Turns out these energy sources were still full of life.  They must have fallen out of someone’s vehicle or bag.  I swooped them up, and put them in my EDC backpack for storage.  I have many flashlights, and headlamps that could use these batteries later.

What have you scavenged around town or in the woods?  It’s always fun to find stuff you can use, especially money.  But don’t get too attached to anything, because you could lose it also.  Like the time when I recently found $20 on the ground, put it in my pocket, only to realized it fell out of my jacket before I could blow it!  

salmon seaside

Seaside Oregon Mosaic Mural Photo of Goodwin Park

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Produced By Cameron McKirdy

In this HD video I demonstrate the power of the high-performance Coast HP314 Focusing LED Light.  This monster has three modes: high, stobe, and low.  On high the beam will travel up to 2240 feet!  Plus, the four D batteries (included) boast an impressive run time of 4 hours 15 minutes.  On low, the HP314 works effectively for 192 hours, at 185 meters.  The long range focusing optic worked extremely well.  You can go from broad view flood beam, to X-Range spot beam with a quick adjustment forward or back.  It illuminates all ranges in between, so you have ultimate control of the intense light.

In the box you get a heavy-duty shoulder strap, and thick protective end caps.  However, they have to be removed after each use, because the light wont fit in the carrying case with them attached.  The HP314 has an amazing feel.  With the strap, its weight is evenly balanced.  I had no issues with grip even when Survival Bros tested it in the rain.  My hands were cold, but it’s just the right size width to grasp naturally.  In addition, the diamond shaped knurling pattern on the casing gives it just enough texture, without being overly abrasive.

It’s durable casing is made of lightweight professional grade aluminum.  The light kept shining after a shock test, when I threw it on the ground several times.  I even had it submerged in murky water for minutes while turned on.  This is an epic tool for rescue and law enforcement professionals, or anyone who needs to see at long distances.  The HP314 weathered the Survival Bros stress test.  All Coast products have a lifetime guarantee.  Their quality is unmatched.  Check out the full line of products at http://www.coastportland.com  More product reviews soon.  Thanks for watching, and visiting my emergency preparedness blog.  Please subscribe to this website, and our Youtube channel to receive all of our posts.  Peace.

coast hp314 picture

P1000580By Cameron Consumption McKirdy

My dad and I have been planning this one for awhile. We hiked half of the Ramona Loop and lots more on Mount Hood in Oregon. It was brutal. The hike was almost 18 grueling miles. We crossed the Sandy River several times, and were on the epic Pacific Crest Trail.

First I will list the gear in my day pack. I rocked a black Kelty day bag with a new U.S.M.C approved 3 liter Camelbak hydration system. I recently got that at a Navy Exchange. Here was my checklist: compass with whistle, emergency poncho, Mylar blanket, Bear Grylls Gerber Ultimate Survival kit, Moleskin plus padding, Coleman biodegradable eipes, caffeine pills, lighter, various fruit and nut bars, GoPro Hero 3 Black on my head, Panasonic TS4 digital camera, Vibrams, Coast LED flashlight with with white and red light, extra socks, Chapstick with SPF, cash, mace pen, Coast Rapid Response 3.0 knife, 12 hour glow stick, Tillamook County turkey jerky, natural bug spray, and hand warmers. My backpack was on the heavy side with all the extra stuff. It weighed maybe 25 pounds.

To begin we hiked from our spot at Lost Creek campground. It was an easy climb along the Sandy river. We crossed it on a temporary wood bridge to get to Ramona Falls. I’d never been there. It was spectacular, and massive. I filmed the waterfall, and snapped pics.

Along the way I spotted several types of mushrooms popping up. Unfortunately, king boletes are a few months away from harvest. I did find out at the Ranger Station that they only give out 20 mushroom collecting permits per day, and commercial hunting is not permitted. Amanita Muscarias are in season. But of course those are hallucinogenic and poisonous. I found a few russulas too. In addition, I identified and tried huckleberries. They aren’t my fav, but were better than nothing when I ran out of aqua.

We met lots of people on the trail. Most were on day hikes like us. The route from Timberline Lodge to Ramona Falls was popular. I wish we did that, because our hike sucked. We were mobbing hardcore for 10 hours straight. We only had a few brief breaks, just long enough to catch our breath, check the map, and grab a snack.

Cameron McKirdy hiking on the trail

I wore new waterproof Columbia boots. They held up, and had lots of cushioning. My tall Nike Dri-Fit training socks helped too. They were dry at the end of the day, and shielded my legs as we bushwhacked the unpopular, overgrown trail. We almost didn’t make it back before nightfall! It was getting dark quickly in the forest. So we had to book it all day. I was dumping buckets of sweat. I went through my entire 3L hydration pack, plus 1.5 coconut waters.

The pain of hiking that much basically nonstop was draining. My feet hurt, knees ached, and balls were sore. Women complain about childbirth, but try hiking with a big pair. I stretched along the way, but my hamstrings were tight. If you plan on doing a trek like this, bring pain killers just in case. I will be sore tomorrow, but didn’t cramp up or anything. I managed.

It will be a day or so before I get back to civilization, and can upload pictures and HD video. I got great shots of the canyon, mountain, and river. The highlight of the day was when pops and I used sticks and hiking poles to cross the rapid Sandy river. It had a path of loose rocks and wet logs. We made it across fine, but my dad realized he left his boots across the river. I got a good laugh in and filmed him tip toeing to safety. So he had to cross 3 times then. He changed into sandals, and me the Vibrams, so we didn’t get our boots wet. More soon. Thanks for visiting the Survival Bros blog.
Sandy River and Mt Hood

Cam McKirdy at Mt Hood

Sandy River Canyon near Mt. Hood

Mount Hood Waterfall in Oregon

Dad crossing the Sandy River for the 4th time.  He won’t leave his boots behind in the future.