Posts Tagged ‘drinks’

By Cameron McKirdy

I stopped by Yogi Tea Headquarters in Springfield, Oregon today.  After buzzing the doorbell I was welcomed inside, out of the rain.  They don’t give tours of the building, but offered me a handful of sample tea packets to try.  I took my time investigating each type, but ended up taking every kind I think.  Pictured are new varieties I’ve never seen on store shelves before.  You can find Yogi teas by the box at nearly every health food shop.  They are delicious.  I’m grateful for the hookup.  It paid off to stop, and inquire.  These will go into my EDC bag immediately for later consumption.  But I got two of their Roasted Dandelion Spice Detox formula, so I will have to drink that tonight. 

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Try organic tea from Yogi https://www.yogiproducts.com

Update:  I went back for this picture of the free sample bowl at headquarters.  I scored 11 more packets from Yogi.  Visit them in Springfield, OR for a hook up.

Yogi Tea Samples

 Help yourself to unlimited free tea just for stopping by

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Produced By Cameron McKirdy and Tactical Gypsy of Survival Bros.

I need coffee, and I need it now.  I’m addicted to Joe, so when the portable GSI Outdoors Commuter Java Press walked into my life, I didn’t let go.  This lightwight, modern french press must have taken years to develop, because it’s awesome.  Survival Bros loves everything about it, plus it makes loose leaf.  Some of the product feature highlights include it being BPA-free, grippy, insulated, and having a non-slip foot.  All this combines for an easy to use, practical, and tactical coffee maker.  The GSI Java Press costs only $22.95.  So at that price why not steal one from them?  There’s nothing negative to say about this product.  It’s been Survival Bros tested, and came out on top.  Visit http://www.gsioutdoors.com for all the information on this piece of gear.  Please comment if you want.  

gsi coffee pressUse the GSI Outdoors Commuter Java Press for hot, fresh coffee!

By Andrew McKirdy
Whiskey Barrel TablesUpcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value.
 
This DIY project started when I sat down for a drink at Rock Bottom Brewery in Denver, Colorado.  I noticed several old whiskey barrels being used for decoration.  I asked my waitress if I could have one, and a few days later the brewmaster and I were loading two freshly used barrels into a borrowed car for transport.   They’d been emptied, but I could still hear swishing when I moved them.  One had been used for a raspberry saison and the other for an ale.  I don’t have a shop, but thankfully a friend let me use his patio to begin work.  I decided I wanted to keep one barrel whole and use it as a kitchen table.  The other I would cut in half and turn into two side tables.  I used a handsaw for accuracy, and finished with a powered skill saw.  For the whole barrel, I drilled a small opening in the bottom to drain the remaining contents.  I scraped the insides with a chisel, removing any loose wood chips.  Then I poured vinegar in the barrels to kill bacteria and prevent future growth.  This also helped get rid of the funky raspberry smell. 
 
I sanded, then dusted off both barrels, to prep them for stain.  I came back the next day, but the stench of high VOCs (nasty chemicals called volatile organic compounds) reeked.  I realized I would need to seal them up.  This would stop the smell, and provide an excellent sheen.  I found a low VOC polyurethane which worked wonders.  Lastly, were the rusty metal hoops, which I wanted black.  After those were painted I priced around for the most affordable glass company.  I was told I needed a tempered piece of glass which cost twice as much, but is infinitely safer and stronger.  Finally the project was complete.  I had taken something that was going to be destroyed, and given it new life in my home.  I researched the name on the barrel and found out it came from the oldest and smallest distillery in Kentucky, originating in 1797.  The Woodford Distillery is in fact a National Historic Landmark.  I have a real piece of Americana.
Vintage Oak BarrelsOak Whiskey Barrels to be upcycled

Survival Bros Founder Cameron McKirdy films spicy Mexican Food grooving to Dubstep.  The feisty taco discusses his cold weather gear setup that allows him to perform Art on the street in Longview, Washington.  This has everything to do with survival. He is working the streets. Thriving, and expressing himself in a world gone mad.

survival bros logo

By Cameron McKirdy

Survival Bros shows you all the stuff that is half off in the back of a Safeway grocery store.

Retail is for suckers. Don’t pay full price for anything, ever again. Store owners get everything wholesale, and you can too.

I often start my shopping trip by going to the back of the supermarket. That’s where you can always find items 50% off, because they are discontinued, damaged, or close to their expiration date. You’d think these products are no good, but I’ve found the sale goods are usually organic, and simply not well known, so they go unsold. Don’t be too good to save money. People pass on these deals because they are too proud, and must feel like the product is inferior to what’s on the regular shelves. It’s silly.

Think about getting a membership at a wholesaler like Costco. It will save you cash, and probably pay for the card on the first trip. Be on he lookout for an asterisk on the price sign at Costco. An * means the item is being discontinued, and it’s not coming back, so the price is usually reduced. Buy more then if needed. Not that I support big box stores, but it’s worth going just for the free food samples. I will have to produce a video on that. And my friends that work there seem to be happy.

You can also compare prices online. Additionally, I like to practice patience, and use eBay auctions to save money. Plus, check out smart phone apps like ShopSavvy that get you the best deal possible. The only time I pay jacked up full retail prices is when I’m buying local. Even then I will haggle. Prices are made up. Things are worth what you pay for them.

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The clearance rack at Safeway in the back