Posts Tagged ‘project’

By Cameron McKirdy

I spent the weekend on the Oregon Coast in Seaside, and had spare time to experiment with a new Art project.  First, I dug through a recycling bin for cardboard to create a small handmade sign with a permanent pen.  Then I rounded up some fun objects I didn’t need anymore, like a Smokey The Bear keychain whistle.  These goods would be available to begin the open bartering.  I spread out a towel, and placed the trinkets on The Prom’s concrete path.

With little effort, and few resources, a self-serve system was born.  A take one, leave one blanket is a place where an item of any kind can freely be exchanged as you see fit.  Share this concept with people in your town.  You wouldn’t believe the response.  Nearly every biker, and pedestrian stopped their forward progress to figure out what was going on.  This open trading system seemed to inspire, confuse, and even make some people greedy.  

I may have seen people taking without giving, thinking nobody was looking, but I’m not sure.  Others had no issue taking nice items, like a Tree of Life necklace pendant, and replacing it with trash.  I found the blanket riddled with wrappers, cardboard scraps, and even half of a marijuana cigarette.  Take a close look at the pictures, and you’ll see other small stuff, like a paperclip, pocket change, flower, price tag sticker, and a pile of sand from the beach.

I discretely checked back every few hours for a day, and saw some of the action in person.  People generously placed beautiful possessions with little hesitation.  There were cool things left behind that I didn’t get a picture of, because I didn’t want to interrupt the process.  My favorite moment was when a 12-year old girl named Krystin Crawford set down her hand painted sand dollars.  She took a braided piece of grasses someone constructed.  The girl enjoyed sharing the Art she made, and getting involved.  See her craftsmanship below.  The found, and re-purposed shells were adorable.  Krystin and her mom came back to the free exchange place the following morning with a positive attitude.  Everything had changed.  This artist endeavour has restored my faith in humanity once and for all, despite some shady, but acceptable transactions by others.

In conclusion, I will try this social experiment again.  I was thrilled to see this interactive art piece evolve rapidly.  I saw joy on many of the participants faces.  This free trading system can be implemented anywhere, at anytime.  Let’s spread the concept, and see the random generousity of others displayed in public.  And remember, you’ll usually get more than you give.  Leave a comment, or question if you like.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.

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Wikipedia information on Bartering and Gift Economy

Oregon Country Faire Take One, Leave One blanket from 2015

Oregon Country Faire Take One, Leave One blanket from 2015

This picture courtesy of Regina Mattingly

By Cameron McKirdy

Check out the vintage bike frame I was given for FREE.  I’ve always wanted an old school Specialized Rockhopper, so I had to fix it up, and ride.  The bicycle needed some TLC.  I bought new handlebars for $1, rubber grips, a back tube and tire, plus located a matching racing seat and post.  It must be a 1989, or 1990 Specialized, featuring Shimano Deore LX components.  The original matching wheels came with.  

Survival Bros also pressure washed everything, to get the road grim off.  Just had to share the photos with the fans.  I haven’t seen this bike, this nice, anywhere online in my searching.  I sold the restored project for $150.  Funny part was, the buyer showed up in a classic Volkswagen Vanagon like mine, so we had lots to talk about, and share.  This bike was just too small for me, with a 17 inch frame, it’s best suited for a teen.  It went to a good home, and freed up space inside my van.  More cycling projects being blogged about soon.  

Specialized Rockhopper CompHolding a Battleship Grey colored Rockhopper Comp frame

Vintage Rockhopper Battleship GreyRiding the fully restored mountain bike for the first time on trails

Read about when I found a Specialized Allez Sport from Goodwill!

By Andrew McKirdy
Whiskey Barrel TablesUpcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value.
 
This DIY project started when I sat down for a drink at Rock Bottom Brewery in Denver, Colorado.  I noticed several old whiskey barrels being used for decoration.  I asked my waitress if I could have one, and a few days later the brewmaster and I were loading two freshly used barrels into a borrowed car for transport.   They’d been emptied, but I could still hear swishing when I moved them.  One had been used for a raspberry saison and the other for an ale.  I don’t have a shop, but thankfully a friend let me use his patio to begin work.  I decided I wanted to keep one barrel whole and use it as a kitchen table.  The other I would cut in half and turn into two side tables.  I used a handsaw for accuracy, and finished with a powered skill saw.  For the whole barrel, I drilled a small opening in the bottom to drain the remaining contents.  I scraped the insides with a chisel, removing any loose wood chips.  Then I poured vinegar in the barrels to kill bacteria and prevent future growth.  This also helped get rid of the funky raspberry smell. 
 
I sanded, then dusted off both barrels, to prep them for stain.  I came back the next day, but the stench of high VOCs (nasty chemicals called volatile organic compounds) reeked.  I realized I would need to seal them up.  This would stop the smell, and provide an excellent sheen.  I found a low VOC polyurethane which worked wonders.  Lastly, were the rusty metal hoops, which I wanted black.  After those were painted I priced around for the most affordable glass company.  I was told I needed a tempered piece of glass which cost twice as much, but is infinitely safer and stronger.  Finally the project was complete.  I had taken something that was going to be destroyed, and given it new life in my home.  I researched the name on the barrel and found out it came from the oldest and smallest distillery in Kentucky, originating in 1797.  The Woodford Distillery is in fact a National Historic Landmark.  I have a real piece of Americana.
Vintage Oak BarrelsOak Whiskey Barrels to be upcycled

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

Watch Survival Bros repair Oregon Ducks Nike shoes with an officially licensed Survival Straps bracelet.  My shoelace broke, and I needed a solution ASAP so I could get back on the road.  It worked out great, because the green color matched my player edition, team issued kicks.

It was easy to unravel the tightly bound milspec 550 paracord strap, taking only a few minutes to get the cordage I needed.  As I mention in the HD video, I did have to cut off the ends so they could pass through the adjustable plastic clasp.  However, it was no problem reheating the tips so they wouldn’t come undone later.  I had plenty of cord to work with, and I cut it to length.  Luckily my new laces were able to pass through the holes as I relaced my Nikes.  Now my shoelaces are stronger than ever, and handy if I need them for another purpose.  Plus, because this was an emergency I will get a new band when I share my story with Survival Straps.  I was worried I was going to be barefoot this afternoon, but I was prepared with my paracord bracelet nearby.  The last thing I want is my shoe to come off when I bike through a busy intersection.  I’m good to go.

oregon-neon-yellow-wide-adss

They have so many cool designs, you really have to look at them for yourself.  I also like the wide double fish tail designs.  At $29.99 the Oregon Ducks Survival Straps is a deal.  You’ll get up to 15 feet of military spec super strong paracord from one bracelet.  Having a little extra cordage in an emergency situation could be the difference between life in death.  Thankfully, I wasn’t in true danger this time.

Here’s a link to my other blog post about Survival Straps.  Please visit Survival Bros again soon.  Best wishes.

Oregon Ducks Nikes RepairedMy fixed kicks with green 550 paracord laces

By Cameron McKirdy

Lately I’ve been rocking a variety of Survival Straps paracord bracelets. Maybe you’ve noticed them in my videos. You’ve probably seen bands like these before, but Survival Straps has taken it to the next level.

These stylish and functional Survival Straps were made in right here in America. They are an innovative company, and they give back. To date they’ve donated more than $722,000 to The Wounded Warrior Project. This program helps soldiers tremendously. I rock my Wounded Warrior Project Survival Strap often. It’s comfortable. I like the marine grade stainless steel adjustable clasp, but it also came with a plastic breakaway pin you can put in for safety. Plus, if you ever need to use the 15 feet or so of cordage, Survival Straps will send you a replacement bracelet. This is an every day carry item you should have for preparedness.

I haven’t taken my Survival Strap apart yet, but when the need arises, I will. There are many varieties and styles on their website http://www.survivalstraps.com Check them out. There’s something for every prepper, and they are reasonably priced. Most cost around $30 or less. I see great value in them. They are made of the finest 550 paracord. You’ll find a color and style that matches your personality. Below is a few cool designs I’ve been wearing. I haven’t had any issue with these. They feel great. Survival Bros approves 100%.

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Here’s recent pictures of the flat black Survival Bros mountain bike. Radar can’t see it. Like? I think I will do a high-visibility bicycle next for safety. Nerd alert.

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