Posts Tagged ‘garage’

Produced by Cameron McKirdy and Tactical Gypsy

Survival Bros opens a brand new blade called the Cold Steel Recon Tanto.  Watch the HD video for the glorious tech specs, and the reasons why we purchased this model.   The weapon will be going to Afghanistan on deployment soon.  It’s a magnificent tool, and a work of art.  Plus, since it’s a Cold Steel, you know its been torture tested to the max, and can take any beating you can dish out.  Like the Recon Tanto knife?  Tell us about it.

logo

In this video we check out a new tool for the woods, cover the details, and our planned usage.  I can’t wait to throw this tomahawk!  The Cold Steel Frontier Hawk feels extremely well balanced.  It’s an excellent value for the low retail price of just $39.99.  Make sure to visit http://www.coldsteel.com to watch their awesome videos, and request a free product catalog and DVD.  

frontier hawk cold steel

You can’t go wrong with the Cold Steel Frontier Hawk in your hand. 

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

Survival Bros has a bug out bike tuned up and ready for camping this summer.  I will produce another HD video on this vintage bicycle when all the bags are on, and the project is complete.  Here’s a previous post on finding the Univega at a garage sale last summer.  

Mens Univega Bicycle Repairs

Before the repairs 

Univega Alpina Pro Bike

After being tuned up, restored to like new condition, and cleaned properly

Thanks for visiting our emergency preparedness blog.  PLEASE SUBSCRIBE (top left of screen).  Thanks!

Check out our friends at Canyonview Cyclery on Facebook!

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

One of the most popular every day carry knives is the Kershaw Chive designed by Ken Onion.  This sly blade features the patented SpeedSafe assisted opening, giving it a remarkable feel.  In the HD video I put the knife to the test, slicing a can, plastic bottle, different types of cordage, and much more.  On Youtube I couldn’t find anyone doing a legit cut test with the Chive, so I made an extreme one.

I was genuinely surprised to see that the Kershaw didn’t dull after cutting the soda can.  I muscled through the bottom, and I was sure it would damage the blade, or at least scratch the titanium-oxide rainbow coating.  But even after that, I was able to shave off a good chunk of arm hair in a few strokes.  The knife did everything I wanted it to, making it a perfect EDC tool.  It’s ultra lightweight too, at only 1.7 ounces.  

The Chive comes in a wide variety of colors, some with different handle materials, but the Rainbow version is the most expensive.  There’s nothing girly about it.  The wild coating reminds me of an oil slick, which are always interesting to look at.  I like the stepped thumb studs, because they are rigid, making the small 1 15/16″ blade easy to open.  However, I prefer to use the flipper on the back, because I feel it’s a little safer, and there’s no chance of slicing my thumb on deployment.  It does have a solid tip-lock system for safety, so the knife won’t open when you pull it out of your pocket.  In addition, I love the long, sturdy pocket clip.  It’s not rainbow, just polished steel with the Kershaw logo etched down it.  Plus, the jimping on the top of the blade gives you more control, which is good because the Chive is small, and somewhat slick due to the coating.

At the end of the day, the Kershaw Chive is a legend.  Trust me, you want one.  It makes a great keychain knife, and if you carry it on you, you’ll use it daily.  For additional tech specs, and to view other models, visit http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/  Thanks for visiting and supporting Survival Bros – your emergency preparedness blog.  Comments, likes, and shares are appreciated.  What knife would you like me to test next, and what should I destroy with it?  Peace.

rainbowchive_1600vib_1The Kershaw Rainbow Chive – Model 1600VIB

My survival keychain video starring The Chive

Popping Blisters with the small knife after hiking on the PCT

By Cameron McKirdy
Last week I traded an antique wooden chest for a bunch of used Swiss Army knives. I kept some, and swapped out others for a new Buck folder.

20130316-163219.jpg
They call this classic the Buck Stockman. I liked it because it has three fatty blades. It’s nothing special, but it will do work. The knife dealer in my town said it was made in China, so it’s not the best quality, compaired to Buck knives made in America. But I will use this folder. The blades on the mini Victorinox tools don’t have much of a surface to work with. They are perfect for the small emergency caches I’ve been burying. All in all, I made a good trade up. The knife dealer pays out half of the retail value of the item. Makes sense. It’s fair to me.

20130316-163803.jpg
I swooped these old knives from an estate sale today. I paid a little too much. $10. I offered $5, but got rejected. I forked it over because it was for a good cause. I should still be able to make a few bucks on these, or trade up later. I’d like another multitool for them. I’m really digging these older knifes with wood handles, so I may keep the large one. The little folding knife was designed to work with a pocket watch. You can see where it would attached to a chain.

I’m hooked on collecting knives. I can’t wait for next weekend so I can hit up more garage sales. The time to buy is when people have to sell. Buying used is way more fun that paying full retail for something. I like that these objects have a history, and I get to add to it. Peace and love.