Posts Tagged ‘park’

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

This weekend Survival Bros went for a drive up I-5, and then took Spirit Lake Highway to visit majestic Mount St. Helens.  Most of the hiking trails were off limits to us because we had a puppy to acclimate to the outdoors for the first time.  Therefore, we found ourselves at Seaquest State Park, which while splendid, doesn’t have well-maintained paths like the nearby Hummocks Trail closer to the volcano.  So, after breaking a sweat there we continued to climb in elevation, and drove to two breathtaking viewpoints called Elk Rock, and Castle Lake.  I shot the HD video above, and snapped a few pictures.  Our final stop was Clearwater Lake.  It formed after the eruption in 1980.  There’s a relatively flat trail circling the body of water, but again no dogs are allowed.  I was willing to risk a minimum $50 fine, but we’ll just have to trek it another time.  Besides, the sun was setting, and my belly was growling.  At Castle Rock we cruised into C and L Burger Bar for a feast.  I’m talking peanut butter real ice cream milk shakes, fatty elk cheeseburgers, and scalding crinkle cut french fries.  Epic.  It was a complete day, and I look forward to returning to Mount St. Helens when it’s warmer, and all the backpacking trails are open to explore.

Mount St. Helens lookout

Clearwater Lake Washington

c and l burger shake

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By Cameron McKirdy I sling a day pack on my back nearly every day.  I’ve mentioned the types of things I have in it before, like gear, food, and a warm change of clothes.  So when I discovered the Ribz Front Pack, I was stoked.  This innovative, steroid injected version of a fanny pack solves many of the challenges I face when backpacking.  Here I am with it on the Hummocks Trailhead near Mount St. Helens in Washington State. Ribz Front Pack One issue I have with a regular backpack is I’m constantly taking it off to grab water, my cell phone, or something else that isn’t handy.  With Ribz Wear, it’s all right in front of me, so I can continue trail blazing.  I also mention in the video how backpacks catch on trees when I have to duck under them.  It usually happens a few times each hike, and I practically have to crawl under the obstacle.  With my gear in front, navigating through heavy brush is considerably easier.  The best part of this system is the pack is easy to adjust.  My Dad’s chest and waist are smaller than mine, so after he used it, a quick tug on the straps in back and in front made it comfortable again for me.  Plus, Ribz have long, padded shoulder straps, so it feels like a natural extension of your body.   Mount St. Helens Adventures Map Check out the map of different Mount St. Helens Adventures.  Back to the Ribz Front Pack review, I must mention the Large version I tested can hold absurd amounts, with an 11 liter capacity.  Even with it packed full, I was able to swing my arms freely.  My dad wore it, and noted that you could still use hiking poles with it on.  Ribz makes smaller Front Packs with 8 liters of room too.  Internally, there are separate pouches to keep smaller items organized.  These elastic lined compartments will hold all your tools close to your ribs, and prevent them from rattling around.  We both ran with it, and the pack remained snug, not bouncing around, or swaying side to side.Mount St. Helens View In conclusion, the Ribz Front Pack is an excellent tool itself.  The quality is unbelievable, and far superior to what I expected.  It’s lightweight, at only 11 ounces, so it beats a backpack there too.  However, I think it would be best suited for use with a rear pack, so the weight of your supplies can be evenly distributed forward and back, thus giving you better posture than wearing one or the other.  But if you’re into ultralight backpacking, Ribz might be a dream come true.  You can’t machine wash Ribz, but it cleans up nicely with a wet rag.  I love the Cordura brand water resistant, ripstop material it’s fabricated with.  I will be sporting my Ribz for a long time.  I like it so much I want the smaller 8 liter pack too for shorter trips, and cross country running.  I just don’t know which color to get next.  Check out http://www.ribzwear.com to grab yours.

Cam makes instant coffee with an emergency water packet at Loowit Lookout near Mt. St. Helens in Washington State.  Subscribe to Survival Bros on Youtube for more!  Thanks for watching!  Feel free to comment.

Mt. St. Helens SelfieCam snaps a selfie with his dad on the trail

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

You gotta see Thompson Falls in Seaside, Oregon.  This waterfall is gorgeous, but also extremely dangerous to get to.  It’s located in the hills North of town.  Please be careful if you do hike out there.  Survival Bros will continue to bring you epic HD videos, but only if you continue to like, comment, and share these blogs.  It’s all for you.  Enjoy!

Thompson Falls Heights EstatesThe start of the 60 foot drop

survival bros logoProduced By Cameron McKirdy.

I thought it would be fun to suffer, and film the superstorm we just had on the Oregon Coast in Seaside.  I was blinded by the fierce pellets of water, and nearly perished smashing into a barricade when the brakes went out on my beach cruiser.  All is well, and I think I scored some superb footage for Survival Bros followers.  First is an HD video I filmed on September 28, 2013.  I biked around Seaside, OR and showed off all the flooding and storm damage.  I covered a lot of ground, and used my GoPro Hero 3 Black head camera to shoot the high-definition action.

On the next day, Sunday September 29th 2013 I biked into Seaside on another, much crappier bike because  I got a flat the day before.  I made it to the sand along the Pacific Ocean, right before the bicycle gave up on me.  It fell apart, and had to be ditched in a bush. This video shows me walking on the beach while the storm sand blasted my body.   Exfoliating.  

Cameron McKirdy GoPro HeadCam is ready to film.


Produced By Cameron McKirdy

On my way to the park for some exercise, I noticed a roadside table bursting with bright dahlias. Next to them was a sign painted “FREE FLOWERS.” What a concept! They could have just left a cash box out there with a price. But nope. It wasn’t too good to be true. It was just someone doing a good deed.

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I got to talk to the retired man tending his garden. He said it’s easier to give them away. Then he doesn’t have to stay out there, or be mad when someone steals the cash. What can you give away today?

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

My dad and I just got back to the Oregon Coast, after a 4 day trip playing on the McKenzie River and the trail. First we geared up, and hit the rapids with the Oregon Whitewater Association. A group of 70 extreme outdoor enthusiasts floated 14 miles down the river. The water was brutally cold, at only 47 degrees. I fell off our cataraft for the first time after we smashed into a log along the bank. I didn’t have time to be fearful. I was just trying to catch my breath from the shock of the water, and keep my legs up as I floated down. Of course, I had a class 3 life jacket on. I swam to the back of the boat, but didn’t like being where I couldn’t see the rocks ahead of me. Plus, I didn’t want to get trapped under the massive military grade raft. So I separated from the craft, and tried to swim to shore, but the water was moving too fast, and nobody there could help me. I swam to the side of the raft, and was barely able to climb back on. I had to quickly jump off the river bottom to boost myself up. I was fatigued, and just wanted to sit down and assess my injuries. I hit my knee on a rock, and bloodied by shin up. I was only in the river for a few minutes, but it wouldn’t have been long before my body started shutting down, and hypothermia set in. It was intense.

I had my iPhone 4S in my pocket with a LifeProof case on when I went overboard. It worked. No water got in thankfully. In my other pocket I was carrying the new Coast DX335 rescue knife. It stayed clipped on, but luckily I didn’t have to use it. You’d be surprised how many people die on the river getting tangled in ropes. Below is a funny clip I took with the LifeProof case on my cell. It took great video, and you can hear my dad yelling at me to put it away. He thought it was going to get splashed, or fall in as we hit the drop in the rapids. Also below is an HD video review of the Coast Products knife. I will update this blog as I get media online. I used my GoPro Hero 3 Black camera to record my treacherous mountain bike ride down the McKenzie River Trail. That will be up soon. Thanks for visiting Survival Bros. Follow us on Twitter, Youtube, and join the community on Facebook. Peace.

 

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

When you are in the field, your gear has to work.  That’s why I pack the best in my bag.  I’ve been testing both the Dukjug, and H2O Lite bottles from GSI Outdoors, featured in the HD video review above.  I hiked out to Cape Falcon in Oswald West State Park.  This Oregon State Park is wondrous, with vast ocean views, and wide waterfalls.  The trail was muddy though, but I live to get dirty.  It’s 2.10 miles to Cape Falcon from the parking lot on Highway 101.  So it took about 45 minutes to get to where I filmed the product review.

The Dukjug is my favorite bottle.  It’s stainless steel, and holds 1 liter.  The design is fun, and colorful.  It’s covered in peace signs, and funky tye dye, so this container fits my hippie personality.  GSI Outdoors makes other designs of this jug too, and even a plastic version, all of which are BPA-free.  Their Dukjug is unique, because it stores duct tape under the rubber band on the outside.  Of course every prepper should have extra tape on hand just in case.  I’d use this bottle for hot liquids, and mixing up drinks, like instant coffee or tea.  It has a wide lid, so you can store anything inside, even food.  The Dukjug tips the scales at 10.1 oz, and retails for $19.95.  That’s a value, because unless you drop it off a cliff, it will last a lifetime.

The H2O Lite is super handy to have around.  It’s collapsible, and weighs next to nothing, only 0.9 oz.  I can just roll it up, and shove it in my backpack.  It takes up virtually no space.  I like that you can write on it, and date it.  Plus, it has a cool cap so it doesn’t leak.  When you want a cold drink, just pop the top, and squirt it in your pie hole.  Graduations are marked on the back too, which could help with cooking when you need to use a precise amount of water.  GSI Outdoors makes smaller versions as well.  I would want to bring one of those on my shorter day trips when I’m going ultralight.  If you need quality camping gear, look no further than this American company.  They have a huge product line you have to check out.  More reviews soon.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog.  Peace and love.Cam @ Cape Falcon

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

I shot this HD video while camping in the Olympic National Forest near Forks Washington.  It’s truly an amazing park.  You must visit.  I tented right near the river, and there’s plenty of challenging hiking trails nearby.  These elk were amazing, and quite noisy.  They were making all kinds of crazy calls.  I wanted to pet one.  Another part of me saw dinner. 

It’s my pleasure to bring to you, my hike on Saddle Mountain in the snow, at night, solo.  I love doing extreme stuff in the outdoors.  It’s a rush, and you’ll get one watching this HD movie.  This is the longest video I’ve produced to date, but it’s packed with action, and epic views.  I will update this post with the details of my journey, and my full review of the LED Lenser products I tested.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros! 

The short version of my hike!

cam hikingProduced By Cameron McKirdy – Survival Bros Founder

 

This weekend my buddy Mac and I biked from Astoria to Fort Stevens State Park located along the Oregon Coast. It was dumping rain. Nearly two hours later, we checked into hiker biker camp, and begun another wild Survival Bros adventure.

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Luckily, Mac’s wife Shauna was kind enough to drop our gear off at camp. Riding in with a 50 pound backpacking bag would have been brutal, and unsafe since we had to negotiate the narrow shoulder of the Astoria bridge. Semis were seeing how close they could get to clipping us. Setting up the massive 8 person tent was easy. The only break we got in the weather occurred when we made camp. After our gear was setup, lantern hanged, and sleeping bag unrolled, we tightened up our boots and peddled deeper into the state park.

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Along the path we stopped to identify many mushrooms. The park was exploding with life. Fungi hunting season is far from over. There were huge patches of fresh Amanitas everywhere. One had a bite taken out of it, as we could see teeth marks. Must have been a deer, or a crazy person.

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Over the last few weeks, my pals and I have scoured a good chunk of Fort Stevens. It’s incredible how many types of terrain there are. From Coffenbury Lake, to the dunes near the Pacific Ocean. I finally found King Boletes just south of the jetty, west of the road. I hunted down the biggest King growing under a tree branch, in pine needles. I got video of me cutting it, but the power is out in Astoria now, so I can’t edit the HD footage. Here’s a photo of the big boletes we found. The choice mushroom nuggets are going in an omelette immediately, and spaghetti tonight for dinner.

Due to my phone about to die, and the power being out, I’m uploading this blog now. I will complete the story, and add more pictures and video very soon. Stay safe out there. We are getting blasted with 98 MPH winds right now. Peace.

– Cameron McKirdy

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This is a picture of Seaside, OR taken today!

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Update: Back to the story. Mac and I spent one night in hiker biker camp. It’s $6 per evening. Fort Stevens actually moved the spot, because where they usually stash the gypsies floods this time of year. When we got into our tent we were soaked. I quickly changed my clothes, then we started making dinner. I busted out a Mountain House lasagna, and boiled the water for it in my Jetboil Zip. After sitting for a good ten minutes in the bag, it was ready to dish out. Mac prepared 8 beef hotdogs on his Coleman stove. The warm grub was much needed. We biked around 15 miles that day.

After mushroom hunting on day one, it poured back at the tent. Luckily the spot we pitched our tent didn’t flood. We didn’t realize how bad of a storm it was until we were in it. Thank God we had shelter. The stoves kept the tent warm for awhile, until we passed out. I was also glad I brought my small windup lantern. It was bright for maybe 25 minutes in between cranks. After that, it cast just enough light to not stumble over our gear and dirty dishes.

On day two in Fort Stevens we ate another Mountain House freeze dried meal for breakfast. I love their blueberry granola with milk. I added freeze dried apples too. We had two more hotdogs each, then set out on our bikes again. This time we went out toward the South Jetty. That’s where we found the King Boletes. I was so amped to find those monster mushrooms. We saw other mushroom pickers out there, and duck hunters too.

We smashed through the brush for a few hours, but the storm kept getting crazier. Mac and I were totally drenched. But the trip was well worth the suffering. We put food on the table, and learned a lot along the way. Foraging is so fun! Supermarkets are for suckers. Our ride swooped us, and we made a clean getaway, and broke camp. You know Survival Bros will be out there again soon. Cheers.

Cameron McKirdy Mushroom Hunting at Fort Stevens State Park

Video of our mushroom foray on the North Oregon Coast

Slideshow of photos taken during our fungi hunt