Posts Tagged ‘ocean’

Produced By Cameron McKirdy with Tactical Gypsy

Homeless.  That’s what we were.  My bro and I stayed on this boat for weeks last summer to avoid paying rent, and getting a regular job.  We were free, and so was our lodging.  But with that comes less.  We had to deal with a lot of crap.  It’s noisy in the Skipanon and Warrenton Oregon Marina.  Sleeping is challenging.  People work on boats at all hours, so there’s usually people clamoring, and trucks hauling.

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Skipanon Warrenton Oregon Marina at Night

Once we had to stay on the boat right after our host varnished the interior.  We opened the craft up, but the stench was still awful.  I got a headache, and while grateful for the place to lay down, I was ready to split and catch the bus into town.  In the HD video above we got a solid fire going, but I didn’t film the smoke that filled the cabin, and it was horrible.  I got a headache from that too.  Again, we lifted the lid on the boat, and opened up the ceiling, but sacrificed warmth.  The Survival Bros slept on a wet mattress because the boat had recently sank.

We had a key to the shower and restroom, but that was a hike from the boat.  Plus, we didn’t want to get hassled by security, so we kept our creeping to a minimum, and laid low.  The smart move was to pee in plastic bottles to avoid detection.  However, the other fisherman on the marina were typically very helpful.  We had their assistance many times when we had to do work on the boat, or move it to another slip.  Speaking of, the rent for a spot there is only $70 per month, and our buddy paid that.  You have to pay a little more for electricity, but it’s still the cheapest place to crash in town.  In exchange for a bed, Tactical Gypsy worked on the boat, making sure the bilge was pumping out water, or whatever.  I kept him company, and learned what I could from the Maritime Scientist.  It was an adventure for sure, and I’m happy to share it with you.  More homelessness tales soon.  Thanks for supporting Survival Bros.  Peace and love.

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Selling waterlogged boat motors for cash

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

The first nasty storm of the season is underway on the Oregon Coast.  The wind is bending trees, and flooding is a possibility.  I’m surprised the power is still on.  Seaside, OR is expected to have gusts up to 80 miles per hour!  Have a survival kit together, and an emergency plan for your family.  Here’s a checklist of supplies to gather just in case of a disaster.

– Water (A gallon per person per day for a minimum of 3 days.)

– Fuel AKA gas for cooking, and dry wood for fire

– Food (Stores could close for days without electricity.  Don’t buy perishable goods that need to be refrigerated.  Think fruit.)

– Candles

– Flashlights and headlamps with fresh batteries

– Blankets

– Shelter (It’s probably a good idea to stay inside, so you don’t get wet and sick.)

– Emergency Weather Radio

– Toys for kids, and treats for pets, because they will be scared in a super storm

– First Aid

– Gas (Fill up your vehicle in case there’s a rush for fuel, and you can’t get some later.)

– Books (Maybe ones on emergency planning.  We don’t want you to lose your mind without TV.)

– Whistle to signal for help

– Multi-tool and Wrench to turn off water, etc.

– Moist wipes, and garbage bags for sanitation and personal hygiene

– Local maps

– Manual Can Opener

– Generator and/or solar charger for electrical devices

– Cash/Silver/Barter Items

– Rain Gear/Warm clothes

– Prescription Medications

– Lighter and waterproof matches

– Paper and Pen for notes, and more checklists

– Communications: Cell Phones with chargers, and two-way radios

With all or most of these things you should be good to go, and ready for a super storm bringing flooding.  If you can think of any other handy items, please leave your suggestions in the comment section.  Thanks, and wish us Oregonians good luck this weekend.  It’s
going to be a wild one.  Peace and love from Survival Bros. 

Here’s a link to the live webcam in Seaside, OR on The Lanai at The Cove so you can checkout the current conditions.

There’s no flooding on Highway 101 right now, but high tide isn’t until this evening.

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seaside odot floodingIt looks like Highway 101 is starting to flood!  Be careful out there.

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

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End of the World – Seaside, OR

PRODUCED BY CAMERON McKIRDY

WARNING – BLOG IS GRAPHIC, AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN.

Survivalism is hardcore. Man has to eat. My bro Tactical Gypsy took matters into his own hands, and seized an opportunity yesterday, killing a wild rabbit and cooking it on a beach bonfire in Oregon. He’s on the Paleo diet, and needs lots of protein to stay lean and healthy. He popped the furry friend with his Glock 40 upon first sight. One bullet put it down. Roger never knew what hit him.

dead bunny rabbit rogerNext, Tactical Gypsy had to clean the cottontail rabbit with the knife shown above. He also removed the cute little feet. It took about 45 minutes to smoke on the fire with some PBR baste. It’s a hearty meal for at least two. To cut up wood, the survivalist and former Marine battoned wood into small chunks with the Coast Products FX350. He is proud to rock this knife as part of this every day carry or EDC. It’s held up remarkably well, considering the tremendous beating Survival Bros has put on it. Great work demonstrating your ability to be self-sufficient Tactical Gypsy. Thanks for the story and picture. Survival Bros salutes you.

If you would like to share a story, photo, or idea with Cameron McKirdy at Survival Bros, please email thesurvivalbros@gmail.com. You’re awesome.

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

When you are in the field, your gear has to work.  That’s why I pack the best in my bag.  I’ve been testing both the Dukjug, and H2O Lite bottles from GSI Outdoors, featured in the HD video review above.  I hiked out to Cape Falcon in Oswald West State Park.  This Oregon State Park is wondrous, with vast ocean views, and wide waterfalls.  The trail was muddy though, but I live to get dirty.  It’s 2.10 miles to Cape Falcon from the parking lot on Highway 101.  So it took about 45 minutes to get to where I filmed the product review.

The Dukjug is my favorite bottle.  It’s stainless steel, and holds 1 liter.  The design is fun, and colorful.  It’s covered in peace signs, and funky tye dye, so this container fits my hippie personality.  GSI Outdoors makes other designs of this jug too, and even a plastic version, all of which are BPA-free.  Their Dukjug is unique, because it stores duct tape under the rubber band on the outside.  Of course every prepper should have extra tape on hand just in case.  I’d use this bottle for hot liquids, and mixing up drinks, like instant coffee or tea.  It has a wide lid, so you can store anything inside, even food.  The Dukjug tips the scales at 10.1 oz, and retails for $19.95.  That’s a value, because unless you drop it off a cliff, it will last a lifetime.

The H2O Lite is super handy to have around.  It’s collapsible, and weighs next to nothing, only 0.9 oz.  I can just roll it up, and shove it in my backpack.  It takes up virtually no space.  I like that you can write on it, and date it.  Plus, it has a cool cap so it doesn’t leak.  When you want a cold drink, just pop the top, and squirt it in your pie hole.  Graduations are marked on the back too, which could help with cooking when you need to use a precise amount of water.  GSI Outdoors makes smaller versions as well.  I would want to bring one of those on my shorter day trips when I’m going ultralight.  If you need quality camping gear, look no further than this American company.  They have a huge product line you have to check out.  More reviews soon.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  Don’t forget to subscribe to the blog.  Peace and love.Cam @ Cape Falcon

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

It’s not easy to set the alarm for 5:30 AM. But the prospect of free food was too alluring. My bro and I geared up, and went down to the beach in Seaside OR, right off of Avenue U. There were swarms of foragers looking for clam shows. The dimples in the sand were everywhere. We got our limit of 15 razor clams in about 30 minutes. Mission successful! We will be back soon. I hope my video entertains, and informs. We had fun shooting it. Maybe next time Survival Bros will show you how we cook the squirmy grub. Thanks for visiting this blog. Comments are always appreciated. Happy hunting. Peace and love.

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This is just under the limit for 2 people with licenses.

By Cameron McKirdy

I’m so sore. I hiked from Seaside to the Hiker’s Cabins on Tillamook Head. It’s just under four miles, but it took nearly two hours. Then the next morning I hiked back, and walked a few more for good measure.

My 55L backpack weighed at least 40 pounds. And I almost wore 5lb ankle weights too. My Dad tagged along. He had hiking poles, which I tried. They took some of the strain off my legs, and gave me a good arm workout. The trail was nasty. So muddy. Dad said it was the worst time of the year to climb there, which made it the best for me. I wanted a challenge.

We had to climb over a few downed trees, but besides mud, the trail was well kept. It was never ending though. My Dad kept asking if we were there yet, like me on our road trips growing up. He said, “if I was on a treadmill, we would be there already.” Yeah. Working out in a gym is nothing like real life.

There were a couple lookouts over the Pacific Ocean, but it was foggy, and rainy. The canopy from the trees sheltered us some, but I was still soaked. I didn’t take any pictures going there, I knew it was going to be sunny the following day. Once we got to the log cabins, I was on my own. I changed clothes, and got my bed ready.

I used a new sleeping system. I just bought a gortex camo bivy, so that was my outer layer. I also brought my Coleman mummy style sleeping bag rated down to 25 degrees. Then I had a mummy shaped inflatable insulated sleeping pad. It was 2.5 inches thick! Comfortable, but next time I want to use one that’s lower profile, so my face has more clearance. It was a tight fit. I’m a big dude, so sleeping in a bivy bag was a little claustrophobic at first.

I passed out super early. 6PM. I was tired, and just trying to stay warm in my bag. I woke up once, just to say hi to the mice in the bunk above me. They checked out my stuff, left their mark, and bounced. I was stoked in the morning when I popped my head out and saw daylight. I couldn’t wait to hike back to Seaside. The sun was shining, and I could see the end of the ocean.

On the trek back I snapped the pictures you see below. It’s a magical place, eager to be explored. I buried an emergency cache up there, full of food, water purification tablets, matches and more. Maybe someday I will have to flee the city, and retrieve it. On hikes like this you are forced to make decisions. Take the long route around the mud pit, or charge it. I went right through the mess usually. Foolishly I tried to take a shortcut down a slick, rocky hill once. I slipped, and tried to plant my heels in the bank, but couldn’t stop. I slid on my butt, until I snatched a root. No blood. I didn’t take a picture of the slide either, I kept charging.

Four miles later, I made it from the cabins to The Cove in Seaside, OR. I walked through the city, and got some strange looks with my backpack on. That and my backside was covered in mud. I made it home, showered, and passed out. I loved every second of the adventure. It was brutal, but I enjoy training hard. Hike Tillamook Head if you can, it’s part of the majestic Oregon Coast Trail. Now where’s the ice?
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By Cameron McKirdy

Season’s greetings!  On Christmas Eve my Dad and I hiked from Indian Beach in Ecola State Park to the Hiker’s Camp on Tillamook Head.  We checked out the abandoned World War 2 bunkers, and the viewpoints too.  Pops split, leaving me to spend the night by myself.  In this HD video I show you the trail, my gear, and my fire.  I also cooked up some Goulash thanks to my new flameless cookwear system by Trekmates.  Enjoy the video.  After a two hour nap, I decided to back to Seaside in the dark night.  It was crazy.  I used a glow stick, and my Coast HP14 flashlight to luminate the path.  A recent storm kicked tons of massive trees down.  I had to climb over many, with my 40 pound pack on.  I booked it from the cabins, and got back to Seaside in just over 2 hours, covering 4 gnarly miles of ground.  It was an intense op.  I lost the trail briefly once, slightly rolled an ankle, and nearly slipped down a steep bank.  It was one of the most rewarding, and challenging adventures of my life.  Next, I plan to raft the Nehalem river this weekend.  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  I’d appreciate your comments, and likes.  %^).

Indian Beach photo P1000380

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Survival Bros had another full weekend. Friends and I journeyed to Cannon Beach, and took the snake-like road to Indian Beach to explore.

The park was nearly empty. I’m use to it being packed with surfers and hikers in the summer. We huffed the path down to the sand, and walked south. The rock formations at Indian Beach are incredible. The tide pools are bursting with life. We found creatures small and large such as barnacles, mussels, starfish, sea anemones, and a dungenous and hermit crab.

Plus, higher on the beach Mac and I identified a patch of medicinal Turkey Tail mushrooms growing on driftwood. He bagged them. Later the shrooms will be ground up, and put in vegetable capsules for preservation. Gotta love free meds. In Chinese medicine they are recognized as yun zhi (云芝). They are known to boost the immune system. We scored two sand dollars as well.

After wandering around Indian, we cruised to Haystack Rock. The tide pool there is famous. I remember visiting in grade school on field trips. We found more of the same sea life here. No sign of One-Eyed Willie, or the Goonies! Beach combing was a blast. The Oregon Coast is legendary.

– Cameron McKirdy

The guys find an ammo can full of trinkets, a logbook, and keys to a riddle! They were hiking Saddle Mountain in Oregon, when they took an obscure trail, and uncovered a hidden geocache. Random. Happy hunting. You never know when you will find treasure.  And of course we won’t tell you where to find this stash.  You got to get into geocaching.  There is an app for that.

Produced by Cameron McKirdy