Posts Tagged ‘Trauma’

Produced By Cameron McKirdy and Tactical Gypsy

A former Marine, currently in the National Guard shows you how to build medical packs to stop bleeding from a traumatic wound.  With a first aid kit like these examples you could take care of yourself during an emergency, or assist another person in need of attention, possibly saving a life.  There’s more to it than gauze and tape though.  You must train, and develop this skill set.  What’s in your med bag?  Thanks for visiting Survival Bros.  

first-aid-kit

Ya caught me with my pants down! I’m blogging while icing my leg. Last week I flew over my handle bars, and landed on lava rocks, biking down the steep McKenzie River Trail. This is my recovery process, with information that could help you heal.

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When I went over my bike, I was wearing a helmet, but not gloves. Stupid. My hands are cut up, and my leg is still swollen and bruised, as pictured. I was covered in dirt, and dripping blood. Before I showered I cleaned my wounds with povidone-iodine antiseptic wipes, and sterilization wipes I typically use to sanitize my hands. Then I iced, but all I had to use was a small ice pack made to chill a sandwich or something else in your lunch. I really needed a large ice pack to go from my knee to my hip.

It’s been 5 days since my bike accident. My leg hurts less now, so I’ve been lightly massaging it. It’s instinctual. Massaging gets blood flowing there, and relaxes battered muscles. I’ve been using the R.I.C.E. method of: rest, ice, compression, elevation. In addition, I poured hydrogen peroxide on my cuts to kill any bacteria. Plus, I have been gently exercising and lightly stretching. I went for a long walk this morning. The only other thing I want to do is put tea tree oil on the surface of my black and blue bruised skin. With more attention and rest, my leg will heal up, and I will stop walking with a slight limp. Be safe out there on your bikes!

When you fall, and get hurt, your will to endure is being tested. You have to get up, dust off, take a breath, and ride on. It’s not easy knowing you can get hurt again, but you have to move forward. I had to fight through the pain, and get my head straight. I couldn’t lose my focus and end up getting injured further. All that mattered was getting to the truck, so I could get to basic first aid supplies, and leftover Hawaiian pizza.

In retrospect, next time I will wear more protective gear, and bring a small First Aid kit. I could have been stranded on the trail for hours with a broken leg. There were only a few people on that path, and I couldn’t get cell phone service. Be smart about the situations you put yourself in. Biking in remote locations should be done with extreme caution. Train hard, rest easy.

– Cameron McKirdy

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