Posts Tagged ‘guide’

I’ve meet most of the famous people that have influenced my life in a positive way, and it’s not by accident.  For the first time ever, I’m divulging my tactics on how to meet celebrities, including artists, athletes, and other inspirational, culturally significant folks.  You may say, “hey Cam, what’s this got to do with SURVIVAL?”  Well, I believe meeting legends improves you as a person, and at the end of the day, all you can hope for is that you are better than the day before.

I think I got hooked on approaching stars in my childhood, when I stalked Portland Trail Blazer players after games with my dad.  They’d be gingerly strolling to their luxury cars, and I’d go in for the kill.  I offered them a basketball to sign with my Sharpie.  Any good autograph seeker knows to bring their own fresh permanent pen.  Nothing is worse that standing in front of your hero trying to bum a pen for a signature.  I caught up to Clyde “The Glide” Drexler, Terry Porter, Buck Williams, and the rest of the old school Blazers.  I remember weaseling close enough to the locker room entrance too, so that I could high five all the players as they ran out on the court.  After that, I didn’t wash my hand for a week.  My mom made me in the end.

I learned as a kid how to approach cool people.  First I would say something like, “Hey, I’m a big fan.  I just wanted to say hi, and ask for you autograph.”  They usually obliged, but I’ve had more than my fair share of epic snubs.  More on that in a second.  Basically, if you see a celebrity, be chill like them.  I offer up a compliment, but don’t go overboard.  Plus, I tell them something about myself, that they can relate to.  I find common ground.  For instance, when I went up to UFC star Chael Sonnen at an amateur MMA event, I shook his hand and told him I was also an Oregon Duck.  Then I mentioned being a ring announcer for mixed martial arts fights in Seaside, Oregon.  I told him maybe I would announce his name one day in the octagon.  I had his attention, and he was happy to pose for a picture, and sign an autograph for me.  I have more autographs than a memorabilia dealer.  Meeting athletes is easy.  Catch them before or after the event, and be polite.

I’ve been snubbed by stars too.  Jack Nickalus passed me by.  Arnold Palmer told me he had signed enough autographs that day.  But the biggest snub of all-time comes from the punk Greg Oden.  This Blazer washout walked by me on Burnside in Portland, while I was talking on my phone.  I hung up, and casually approached him while waiting for a crosswalk light to change.  We were the only ones on the block.  I said, “hey Greg, I’m a big fan (lie), and I just wanted to say hi and shake your hand.”  Greg Oden looked me up and down, and then looked away, not saying a word.  I backed up slowly proclaiming, “Greg Oden just snubbed me!”  Then I yelled for all of PDX to hear, “Greg Oden is too good for the world!!!”  The realest thing I’ve ever said.  I told that story on my radio show on the Oregon Coast.  I still plan to burn his basketball card on camera.  It will never be worth anything. 

Most celebs aren’t goons, so don’t be afraid to go up to them.  One of my favorite encounters was when I slept on the street in Los Angeles to have a chance as a contestant on The Price is Right.  I went during spring break right after I turned 18.  It took 14 hours of waiting in line before I stormed CBS Studios and sat front row, one seat over from Contestant’s Row.  I didn’t play any pricing games that day, but I did have a long conversation with Bob Barker himself.  He towered over me, high on the stage.  During a commercial break I had the courage to raise my hand and ask him a question, but not a stupid one.  I’m sure he’d been asked during every damn taping about when he is doing Happy Gilmore 2.  I could tell Bob was sick of that comment, so I buttered him up like hot corn on the cob.  He read my price tag name tag, “Yes Cameron.”  I said, “Bob, after all these years, how do you look so good, and stay so fit?”  Perfectly executed.  He rambled for 5 minutes about his days in the military, and training, and so on, then went back to the show.  However, to my surprise, when he was way across the stage during the next break he said, “anyways Cameron, back to your question.”  I still have that yellow price tag sticker with my name on it.

I could go on all day about the well-known people I’ve met.  Mainly, you just need to be on the lookout.  Get very familiar with the faces of people you appreciate.  Be ready to approach, and try to know their schedule.  When I worked at the mall running a kiosk, I had mini football helmets stocked, so I could throw up my back in whenever I feel like it sign, and get that autograph.  This was in Eugene, and athletes from Oregon and around the country shopped there.  I even had one foot by one foot sections of hardwood floor on standby for basketballers to sign.  I remember bothering U of O sensation Luke Jackson for an autograph when I finally hunted him down in Macy’s.  He said, “what do you just carry pieces of wood around?”  I said yes, but he scribbled on one anyway.  I met comedian Carlos Mencia in the mall too, and Steve “The Crocodile Hunter” Irwin’s family.  My picture with Bindi Irwin is classic.

This is getting long, but the point is that you can meet influential people too.  Have guts, be ready, and meet them with confidence.  Gifts don’t hurt either.  I once went to legendary Air Jordan shoe designer Tinker Hatfield’s pad with a house warming gift.  I crashed his party, but he invited me in anyways.  I gave him the best ceramic vase I’d ever made.  He put it on his mantle, and gave me a 45 minute tour.  Just goes to show you that if you appreciate others, they will appreciate you.  I can’t imagine the person I’d be if I hadn’t met the people that inspire me to go hard.  The World is yours.  Don’t let anybody bring you down.  Meeting famous people is your God given right.

Meeting Famous PeopleFrom top left: Cameron McKirdy with Haloti Ngata (NFL), Joey Chestnut (#1 Pro Eater), Aston Eaton (#1 athlete on Earth), Bindi Irwin (Freed Willy), Chael Sonnen (UFC), Badlands Booker (rapper, competitive eating champion), Joey Harrington (Oregon Duck QB), Erick Lindgren (#1 poker player in the world), Terrell Brandon (NBA All-star)

By Cameron McKirdy

When I train outdoors on my bike, and hiking, I like to bring most of my Bug Out items in my backpack. I carried a heavy book bag through school, and now useful item are included. However, many people don’t have emergency preparedness packs ready to go. Like my friend Kate for example. When we went hiking on Saddle Mountain, she brought a funky backpack with one strap. I knew that was going to be uncomfortable, but I didn’t say anything. Later I took her old bag with wrappers inside, and upgraded to another backpack with two straps. I built a better survival bag, starting with the weight being more evenly distributed on the hips. Here’s her emergency preparedness day bag after the hike, before I got to look at it and add items.

20130911-152925.jpg
Before Kate had some helpful gear, but it was still unorganized. Now her stuff is protected in heavy duty Zip Lock bags. Plus, I wrote her a list of all the things she needs, and checked off the items she already has.

20130911-153350.jpg
Here’s Kate’s New Bug Out Bag List:
– Light Stick x 2
– Pink Flashlight (with extra batteries)
– Tooth Paste
– Travel Tooth Brush
– Floss x 2
– CRKT Pazoda folding knife
– Cabela’s Multitool
– Repel Natural
– Kleenex Tissue Paper
– Wet Ones
– Secret Deodorant
– First Aid Kit with extra bandages
– Emergency Space Blanket
– Tampons
– Pain Pills
– Compass 4 in 1 tool keychain
-Tea Kit
– Instant Coffee/Sports Drinks
– Mascara
– Protein Bars and other food and packets of salt, pepper, etc
– Lighter
– Waterproof Matches
– Ponchos
– Extra trash and plastic bags
– Foil
– Local Map
– Chapstick
– SPF Protection
– Change of clothes
*What about barter items?
– Water bottles
– Treatment Drops
– Signal Mirror
– Super Foods/Vitamins
– Stove
– Spork
– Candles
– iPhone headphones/USB charger
– Weather Radio
– Shampoo sample
– Tweezers
– Razor Blade
– Scrunchie
– Duct Tape
– Paper/Pen/Pencil
– Nail Cutters
– Envelops with Forever Stamps
– Paper Clips & rubber band
– Moleskin
– Sunglasses
– Ear plugs
– Silver Rounds
– Tarp
– Survival Bros Paracord Bracelet
– Coffee Filters
– Contacts List
– Cash

With a Bug Out Bag Checklist, you’ll know exactly what you have on hand. Now if Kate gets a flat tire, and has to walk to town because her new car doesn’t have a spare, she can grab her B.O.B., and improve her situation. Another survival scenario she’s prepared for is simply having to bug out at a friend’s or relative’s house for 72 hours or more.  Today that’s possible, and even easy.  The new and improved pack will be on her back, handy in the apartment, or in the trunk of the car, depending on her needs that day. It’s the minimum you should have tucked away for a rainy day. Of course systems vary, and change over time. What’s in your survival bag?

Mt. Hood Summer 2013

Survival Bros recently had the opportunity to tour The Fruit Loop near Mt. Hood. This abundant area is less than 1 hour from Portland. We checked out farms, orchards, vineyards, lavender fields, and even an alpaca ranch. It was a scrumptious trip. I stocked up on all sorts of goodies, and tried every free sample imaginable.

Mt. View Orchards Inc. The first spot we rolled up on was Mt. View Orchards Inc. My parents have been there before, and already knew they had some of the best prices on fresh fruit. We were in the market for a variety of apples, blueberries, and peaches specifically, since they are in season now and being celebrated. This fruit stand is located in Parkdale, with a spectacular view of Mt. Hood. The fruit looked even better, and I took the opportunity to use a fruit picker to snag the choicest peaches growing on huge, abundant trees. There were several types to try, including excellent tiny donut-shaped peaches. After picking a box full, we headed to the store there to pay and try all the samples. There was apple cider, dried pears with cinnamon-sugar, raw honey, fudge, and every kind of jam and peppered jelly you could imagine. Calorie restriction didn’t cross my mind. Before we bounced to the next farm, I examined and swooped up six ears of sweet corn for a buck.

Cameron McKirdy picks fruit

mt view corn

Next stop was Draper Girls Country Farm. They offer U-pick and We-pick varieties of cherries, nectarines, pears, prunes, etc. However, Survival Bros and Co. were more interested in the goats and pigs. They are USDA approved, and so damn cute. We said hi to them, snapped pictures, tried their fruit samples, and rolled on. We got most of our fruit at the first stop. Draper Girls were pretty proud of their bounty, but it’s still cheaper than the grocery store. Fun place, and beautiful. They made me crave some fresh goat milk for sure. If you’re looking for a vacation, Draper Girls rents out the farm house year round.

Draper Girl's Fruit Stand

Draper Girls Country Farm

Draper Girl's Goat Farm

A short drive down the road was Cascade Alpacas and Foothills Yarn & Fiber. Can’t say I’d seen an alpaca before. These goofy creatures have a purpose though. They produce soft yarn for knitting, crocheting, weaving, and spinning. The yarn shop had a huge selection of equipment, and gifts. I liked the beanies and socks, but spent my money on feeding the alpacas instead. They were hungrier than me! So I fattened them up with alfalfa pellets. I did try to eat an alpaca, but the owner said no. That would be like eating a horse. Which way to the BBQ? The alpaca farm was worth the trip. We even got to see some babies. They sheer the young ones for yarn after just a few weeks.

Cascade Alpacas and Foothills

Cascade Alpacas Owner

After nearly biting into an alpaca, I needed to relax. The Hood River Lavender Farms were next. It features epic views of Mt. Adams, Hood, and the Hood River Valley. The small gift shop had Lavender Oil, lotions, and other products derived from the 70+ types of certified organic lavender grown there. We didn’t stay long, or even pick a bouquet, but it was interesting. They were also growing hops on the shop, which was cool.

Hood River Lavender Farms

About this time we got hungry and ate lunch in town at an authentic Mexican joint. Then Survival Bros went to the Apple Valley Country Store and Bakery. I regret not getting their BBQ. How about some cherry-wood smoked ribs? Instead I opted for marionberry pie with Tillamook vanilla ice cream. Here they had tons of free samples. Below is a photo of us putting apple butter on a cracker. I’d go back to this country store.

Apple Valley Country Store & Bakery

We made a quick stop at the Mt. Hood Winery. They had live music, and a big tasting room that wasn’t too crowded. I didn’t feel like spending $7 on a glass of Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir, Riesling, or anything else. I had a taste, but I think it was just too hot out, and my belly had had enough. I was most impressed with the vintage James Bond movie posters in the men’s restroom. I almost busted the camera out for those, but decided against the bathroom photography. It’s a nice place. Finally we traveled to The Gorge White House, where they serve Mt. Hood wines, and some 25 other local bottles. This historic home sits on a century old working farm. My crew sipped their hard ciders. I enjoyed the mixed berry variety. In The Gorge White House we drank a “Heritage Pear Wine.” It was tasty, so I took a bottle home for $19. There was lots going on here, between a bridal shower, the store, a food cart, tasting rooms, and a massive flower garden to explore. You’ll want to visit this farm. All said and done, nothing beats the splendor of Oregon’s Hood River County Fruit Loop. It’s 35 miles of vast orchards, farms, fruit stands and kind people. I did all this in a day, but you could easily spend two full days leisurely strolling along this community. Visit www.hoodriverfruitloop.com for more info. Thanks for stopping by the Survival Bros blog.

The Gorge White House U-Pick fields

P1000580By Cameron Consumption McKirdy

My dad and I have been planning this one for awhile. We hiked half of the Ramona Loop and lots more on Mount Hood in Oregon. It was brutal. The hike was almost 18 grueling miles. We crossed the Sandy River several times, and were on the epic Pacific Crest Trail.

First I will list the gear in my day pack. I rocked a black Kelty day bag with a new U.S.M.C approved 3 liter Camelbak hydration system. I recently got that at a Navy Exchange. Here was my checklist: compass with whistle, emergency poncho, Mylar blanket, Bear Grylls Gerber Ultimate Survival kit, Moleskin plus padding, Coleman biodegradable eipes, caffeine pills, lighter, various fruit and nut bars, GoPro Hero 3 Black on my head, Panasonic TS4 digital camera, Vibrams, Coast LED flashlight with with white and red light, extra socks, Chapstick with SPF, cash, mace pen, Coast Rapid Response 3.0 knife, 12 hour glow stick, Tillamook County turkey jerky, natural bug spray, and hand warmers. My backpack was on the heavy side with all the extra stuff. It weighed maybe 25 pounds.

To begin we hiked from our spot at Lost Creek campground. It was an easy climb along the Sandy river. We crossed it on a temporary wood bridge to get to Ramona Falls. I’d never been there. It was spectacular, and massive. I filmed the waterfall, and snapped pics.

Along the way I spotted several types of mushrooms popping up. Unfortunately, king boletes are a few months away from harvest. I did find out at the Ranger Station that they only give out 20 mushroom collecting permits per day, and commercial hunting is not permitted. Amanita Muscarias are in season. But of course those are hallucinogenic and poisonous. I found a few russulas too. In addition, I identified and tried huckleberries. They aren’t my fav, but were better than nothing when I ran out of aqua.

We met lots of people on the trail. Most were on day hikes like us. The route from Timberline Lodge to Ramona Falls was popular. I wish we did that, because our hike sucked. We were mobbing hardcore for 10 hours straight. We only had a few brief breaks, just long enough to catch our breath, check the map, and grab a snack.

Cameron McKirdy hiking on the trail

I wore new waterproof Columbia boots. They held up, and had lots of cushioning. My tall Nike Dri-Fit training socks helped too. They were dry at the end of the day, and shielded my legs as we bushwhacked the unpopular, overgrown trail. We almost didn’t make it back before nightfall! It was getting dark quickly in the forest. So we had to book it all day. I was dumping buckets of sweat. I went through my entire 3L hydration pack, plus 1.5 coconut waters.

The pain of hiking that much basically nonstop was draining. My feet hurt, knees ached, and balls were sore. Women complain about childbirth, but try hiking with a big pair. I stretched along the way, but my hamstrings were tight. If you plan on doing a trek like this, bring pain killers just in case. I will be sore tomorrow, but didn’t cramp up or anything. I managed.

It will be a day or so before I get back to civilization, and can upload pictures and HD video. I got great shots of the canyon, mountain, and river. The highlight of the day was when pops and I used sticks and hiking poles to cross the rapid Sandy river. It had a path of loose rocks and wet logs. We made it across fine, but my dad realized he left his boots across the river. I got a good laugh in and filmed him tip toeing to safety. So he had to cross 3 times then. He changed into sandals, and me the Vibrams, so we didn’t get our boots wet. More soon. Thanks for visiting the Survival Bros blog.
Sandy River and Mt Hood

Cam McKirdy at Mt Hood

Sandy River Canyon near Mt. Hood

Mount Hood Waterfall in Oregon

Dad crossing the Sandy River for the 4th time.  He won’t leave his boots behind in the future.

By Cameron McKirdy (1/1)

20130719-113320.jpg
Horns are hot in PDX right now! That’s what I heard from a friend, so when I saw a pair at a pawn shop in my hood, I snagged them. This post is about trading for goodies, and trying to hustle at clothing resale shops in Portland, OR.

First, let me tell you about these horns. I wanted them, so I tried to find something I didn’t want, of some value, to swap at the pawn shop. I traded a motorcycle jacket, iPod shuffle, and $20 for the pointy pair. Once acquired, I drove to Portlandia to make a deal. My homie had athletic shorts for me, and desperately wanted a set of horns to accent her fashionable pad. She loved them, mounting them on her wall above the couch. I bet they stay there collecting dust until she can find something better to trade for. That’s her business. I was pumped on the gear I got, and am wearing as I blog now. It was a fun, and solid trade for all.

I also mobbed to a few clothing resale shops where you can buy, sell, and trade. The Red Light Clothing Exchange on Hawthorne Blvd was full of wacky, tacky, junk. Apparently my clothing was too good to accept. They want crap, not new threads. I should have brought in my ripped, and stained stuff instead, and thrown it in the mud before. And I’m not one to judge, but their use of a B.O. air freshener wasn’t appreciated. The lady evaluating my clothing was a snob. She looked it all over quickly, and threw it back at me, saying “these aren’t for us.” That was it. No have a nice day. She walked away. I guess kindness isn’t trendy over there. Next.

Finally, I tried my luck with Buffalo Exchange on W Burnside St. I’ve dealt with them in the past, and sold some Nike Oregon Duck gear for a little. They had better looking women, and clothing there. I perused. They offered me $15 in trade, or $10 and some change cash for three shirts. I took the money and ran. I knew I wouldn’t get offered much at these resale places, but I thought it would be interesting to try. A learning experience for sure. I’m better off donating old clothes, or selling it online, so I don’t have to waste time and $. Nothing sucks more than paying $5 for parking every spot you go to in Portland. You should never have to pay to park. But I’m an idealist.

20130722-160838.jpg
Survival Bros hit up Voodoo Donuts – The Magic is in the Hole!!

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

It’s not easy to set the alarm for 5:30 AM. But the prospect of free food was too alluring. My bro and I geared up, and went down to the beach in Seaside OR, right off of Avenue U. There were swarms of foragers looking for clam shows. The dimples in the sand were everywhere. We got our limit of 15 razor clams in about 30 minutes. Mission successful! We will be back soon. I hope my video entertains, and informs. We had fun shooting it. Maybe next time Survival Bros will show you how we cook the squirmy grub. Thanks for visiting this blog. Comments are always appreciated. Happy hunting. Peace and love.

20130429-153714.jpg
This is just under the limit for 2 people with licenses.

If you’re looking for the perfect gift this Christmas for the prepper on your list, take a look at our Amazon Wish List. It’s also a Survival Bros Donation page. Your gifts to us help keep this blog going, and make us more prepared. All content on this site is provided for free. Please help. Your support is greatly appreciated. Thank you. Click here for emergency preparedness gift ideas, from superfoods, to signal mirrors.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/1MLVC8ALHXBH5/ref=topnav_lists_1

Holiday-Christmas-Gifts-Red

Happy holidays from your friends at Survival Bros. This community is really taking off. The members of our Facebook Group has doubled this month. Like us, and we’ll like you back. http://www.facebook.com/SurvivalBros

When the power goes out, it’s important to get a light source, and make sure everyone there is OK. Once your secure, with emergency food, water, and shelter, you can do these things to pass time.

1. Talk with those around you or via phone
2. Play games, cards, board games, etc.
3. Take a hot shower in case warm water runs out
4. Cook more food to store energy in your body, and other containers
5. Work on preps, like checking the power of your batteries, or bottling extra water
6. Read a good book or new magazine
7. Play handheld video games, or DVDs on a laptop
8. Go outside, assuming it’s not dangerous

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

20121126-104902.jpg

 We’ve compiled an extreme reading list that is sure to make you more self-sufficient.  These are our favorite books.  Please comment if you have other suggestions.  Turn the page.

The Ultimate Suburban Survivalist Guide – The Smartest Money Moves to Prepare For Any Crisis by Sean Brodrick

How To Survive The End Of The World As We Know It – Tactics, Techniques, And Technologies For Uncertain Times by James Wesley Rawles

Patriots: A Novel of Survival in the Coming Collapse by James Wesley Rawles

Emergency Food Storage & Survival Handbook – Everything You Need to Know to Keep Your Family Safe in a Crisis by Peggy Layton

Animal Farm and 1984 by George Orwell

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Seed to Seed: Seed Saving and Growing Techniques for Vegetable Gardeners by Suzanne Ashworth and Kent Whealy

A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine by Eric A. Weiss

The Revolution – A Manifesto by Ron Paul

How to Stay Alive in the Woods: A Complete Guide to Food, Shelter and Self-Preservation Anywhere by Bradford Angier

Mushrooms Demystified by David Arora

Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times by Steve Solomon

When Technology Fails (Revised & Expanded): A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency by Matthew Stein

Crash Proof 2.0: How to Profit From the Economic Collapse

Preppers are ready 24/7. That’s why many of us carry the same items everyday. This blog covers essential EDC items that can help tackle daily challenges.

I usually go everywhere with my tactical backpack. It looks like a regular sized black book bag, but it’s loaded with goodies. In it I have: a mace pen, a regular pen, money, my Gerber Rex Applegate folding knife, a small tactical LED flashlight with belt clip, a carabiner with bottle opener, bandana, sunglasses, paracord, small first aid kit, keys, extra clothes including a poncho and rain pants, extra socks, healthy snacks, spring water in an aluminum bottle, a small multi-tool, vitamins, pain reliever, a beanie, wet wipes, tiny compass, iPhone and charger, a good book, and variously colored and textured condoms. I feel ready.

You don’t have to carry a full backpack of course, but you should have some of these items in your pockets at all times. Survival Bros recommends you have some sort of protection on you always, just in case. Many of my bros pack a pistol, and an extra magazine.

A noise maker, like an air horn or whistle would be smart too. And try to carry something that can start a fire, such as a Bic lighter. Also, consider having a water filter handy. I have an Aquamira filter in my pack that attaches to my internal water pouch hose.

If you carry some or all these items regularly, you will be more prepared than most. Thank yourself for learning this info, and pass it on! Peace from my tent.

– Cameron McKirdy
Survival Bros President

20120727-000706.jpg

20120829-093002.jpg
Another extreme Survival Bros EDC example