Posts Tagged ‘list’

I left my phone in a friends car. I didn’t have their number memorized, so I messaged them on Facebook. No response. Thinking my phone was in the glovebox on silent, I called my number anyway. They picked up, and drove back. That’s why I don’t like wearing shorts without pockets.

If my phone was really lost or damaged, I’d want a list of emergency contacts on me or nearby. Also, if I was ever injured, having these numbers on my person could save my life. So I created a list of people I can trust. Then I copied it.

I rolled up one list, and put it in a small metal geocache bottle. I hung that from my backpack I use everyday. The other contact list is folded up, and tucked behind my black Magpul IPhone 4S case. I will make another list for my wallet, and then a digital copy for my laptop, and backup USB thumb drive. This is just another small preparation that could save the day.

Note: Emergency responders may look in your phone for a contact named I.C.E. (in case of emergency). Store your top contact as ICE.

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Produced by Cameron McKirdy

Produced by Cameron McKirdy in Seaside, OR

I produced this video today because  I want you to be safe, and prepared.  Survival Bros encourages you to get ready for disasters you can see happening in the future.  Build your bug out bag, so you always have what you need.  Consider putting together survival caches of different sizes, along your escape route, or near locations you may sleep, like at a relative’s house.  Plan ahead today.  What’s in your emergency cache?  

Hey friends.  I had to show you my Swiss Army multitool.  This is a super rare traveler’s set.  I couldn’t even find a picture of it on the internet.  I bought this 10 years ago while traveling through Europe.  I saved around 50% by purchasing it in Switzerland, compared to the states.  The set cost me 127 Francs.  Which today converts to $138.99 US.  It’s one of the nicest knives Victorinox makes, and came with a compass, Maglite Solitare keychain flashlight, and leather carrying case.  The best part is, I got the side of the knife engraved with my name for free.  It’s mint, but I’m going to start using it as part of my EDC, or every day carry. 

Unfortunately, I left the batteries in the flashlight, and now I can’t get the end cap off to fix it.  So I’m sending it to Maglite for a free repair or replacement.  I just have to pay for shipping.  That’s the second flashlight I’ve found this week that had the batteries leak.  Not cool.  Lesson learned.  Take the batteries out, or keep them fresh.  You can find just the knife for sale online for about $75.  It got a 5 star rating on Amazon.  It’s no wonder, because they’ve been in business since 1884.

swiss army victorinox champ traveler's set
Produced by Cameron McKirdy

If you’re looking for the perfect gift this Christmas for the prepper on your list, take a look at our Amazon Wish List. It’s also a Survival Bros Donation page. Your gifts to us help keep this blog going, and make us more prepared. All content on this site is provided for free. Please help. Your support is greatly appreciated. Thank you. Click here for emergency preparedness gift ideas, from superfoods, to signal mirrors.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/1MLVC8ALHXBH5/ref=topnav_lists_1

Holiday-Christmas-Gifts-Red

Happy holidays from your friends at Survival Bros. This community is really taking off. The members of our Facebook Group has doubled this month. Like us, and we’ll like you back. http://www.facebook.com/SurvivalBros

Pets love trails. We run, jump, and play in the mud, and our puppy does the same. Here at Survival Bros, we care about our animals, so we take good care of them, and prepare for their survival needs. This is a short list of items to have in a pet first aid kit. Some of these things you may already have on hand. All items can fit in a large Ziploc bag, which we like so everything is easy to see. Any portable waterproof container would be wise. Or you can even make a tactical dog vest, so they can carry their own gear. The point is, make one that works for you and your furry friend too.

  • Blunt tipped scissors to cut away clumped hair, or tangled sticks without poking your pet.
  • Bottle of eye wash solution is a great sterile way to flush any debris from your pets eye.
  • Hydrogen Peroxide works well for cleaning small wounds.
  • Triple antibiotic ointment for dressing wounds after they have been properly cleaned.
  • Sterile nonstick pads are best as adhesive strips don’t really stick to puppy fur (Vet Wrap).
  • Nail trimmers, tweezers, and comb.
  • A leash in case it’s not your animal your treating, you still need to be able to control them if they are able to walk.
  • A big clean towel to dry them off, warm them up, or if needed, stop bleeding by applying pressure.
  • A muzzle that fits your animal is good to have in your kit in case they are scared, or hurt bad enough. You love them, they love you, but in a fear moment while you’re trying to help them, they might bite you. Also consider putting a plastic cone around their head to prevent further injury.
  • Rain coat or poncho with hood.
  • Harnesses are helpful.
  • Also, make sure to have your animal’s tags on them in case they get lost. You can also have a microchip implanted in your pet for security reasons, and tracking. It’s a little 1984, but it could come in handy if a collar breaks.
  • Instant Cold Pack for swelling.
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine) for insect bites and bee stings.
  • Rectal thermometer.
  • Gloves.
  • Extra pet food and water.

Basic first aid is applicable to animals and humans. Knowing how to properly clean and dress a wound is survival basics. Being able to do it on yourself, someone else, or a pet means you can potentially safe the life of a loved one. In an emergency, remember to keep calm, think rationally, and address one issue at a time. Be extreme out there people, and take your pets outside with you! And please visit Survival Bros again soon. Peace.

 We’ve compiled an extreme reading list that is sure to make you more self-sufficient.  These are our favorite books.  Please comment if you have other suggestions.  Turn the page.

The Ultimate Suburban Survivalist Guide – The Smartest Money Moves to Prepare For Any Crisis by Sean Brodrick

How To Survive The End Of The World As We Know It – Tactics, Techniques, And Technologies For Uncertain Times by James Wesley Rawles

Patriots: A Novel of Survival in the Coming Collapse by James Wesley Rawles

Emergency Food Storage & Survival Handbook – Everything You Need to Know to Keep Your Family Safe in a Crisis by Peggy Layton

Animal Farm and 1984 by George Orwell

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Seed to Seed: Seed Saving and Growing Techniques for Vegetable Gardeners by Suzanne Ashworth and Kent Whealy

A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine by Eric A. Weiss

The Revolution – A Manifesto by Ron Paul

How to Stay Alive in the Woods: A Complete Guide to Food, Shelter and Self-Preservation Anywhere by Bradford Angier

Mushrooms Demystified by David Arora

Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times by Steve Solomon

When Technology Fails (Revised & Expanded): A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency by Matthew Stein

Crash Proof 2.0: How to Profit From the Economic Collapse

An Every Day Carry EDC Example

The following was submitted by Kelvin.  This is what he never leaves home without, and why.  

Love your site. I check it often, wanted to show you my EDC, or Every Day Carry.

Droid 3, rooted and running custom rom, allows me better 1080p video, better HDR photos, and instant flashlight access using my power button. The BodyGlove case is a must in my life, the tight fit keeps it from eating all the space in my pocket, but the synthetic leather feel matches perfect with my black leather car.  Pro tip: Keep $20 between the phone and the case.  This is an excellent cash stash in a pinch.

Off Brand Knife, it has been my EDC for over 2 years now, and I still can’t kill it. Spring assisted so it flicks open FAST! The emergency glass smasher and the seatbelt cutter keep me safe in an emergency, as well as a tactical defense device. For only $10 I plan on buying another one as soon I can I find one.

Nebo CSI LUMA, using a single AA battery it can outlast itself before the battery dies. Seriously, it’s as reliable as gravity and just as cheap to use. I picked this up because its roll resistant, sturdy as all hell, has a glow in the dark bottom click button, and I liked the font teeth on the lens. Perfect for opening beer bottles, lighting your way, or smashing someone’s face with it.

Bic Lighter, I prefer the brown ones as they are less common, and there for harder to get stolen. IE, Bic’ed by someone who has the same color as you. You have to remove the child proof lock on it or else it doesn’t belong in your pocket. Fire, bottle opener, floatation device for a fishing lure… the list goes on. Carry a bic people. Anything less is useless.

Chapstick, beeswax is better than paraffin and usually lasts longer on your lips. In a pinch you can burn it, or use it to dress a small abrasion, or scrape. Nothing involving blood though as it’s not a clotting agent.

Wallet, I didn’t break it down to much, because that’s almost a thing in itself as far as how much cash and coin to carry, so I’ll keep it to a simple break down.  It’s a Fossil leather wrapped canvas bi-fold that has seen much abuse and only gets better with time.

  • Rubber Band, I get money, and I like to keep it banded together. Could be used for any number of other uses.
  • Bobby pin, Used again to separate money for whatever reason, used to stir the tobacco in my pipe, and in a pinch the spring steel can be used to jimmy open a lock.
  • Multi-function Credit Card Survival Tool, is a plate of high grade stainless steel in a case that should only be used in EMERGENCYS. It has a knife edge, a can opener, a small saw, a flathead/Philips screw driver, a nail file, a ruler going to 3”, a bottle opener, has a hole for it to be used as a signaling mirror, a staggering sized multi wrench, has a V grooved rope cutter, plus a North delineation on it to be used in conjunction with its straight edge to aide in map reading, I’m sure I could list more, but I won’t. Spending less than $3 on this was worth it!