Archive for the ‘Pets/Animals’ Category

Produced By Cameron McKirdy

Survival Bros decided to help a previously abandoned shelter pup out, and take him for a walk around Lake Sacajawea in Longview, Washington today.  Charlie spends way too much time in his concrete kennel, and was aching for attention, and exercise. The shelter is completely full of dogs right now, and would like to get some adopted out immediately.  Stop by or give them a ring if you need a buddy.

charlie

 When we got to The Humane Society of Cowlitz County they asked if we would release a wild, rescued duck too.  I’m a University of Oregon Duck, so of course I helped out.  We put the female in a crate, and drove to it’s home on the water.  She followed us for a ways down the path, but eventually settled in, and got regrouped.  All in a good days work.

Saddle Mt Summit Photo

Ready or not, my chubby puggle Mocha was going hiking with me.  I took the pug/beagle combo to the top.  She made the summit by herself, but it was a struggle.  It was a sweltering 80 plus degrees out.  My poor dog hasn’t been training hard lately.  Her exercise routine consists of going from the couch to food and back.  But Mocha and I have hiked, so I knew the 5-year-old mutt still had it.  I remember the first time I let her off the leash on a trail.  She was running back and forth, up and down it.  The puggle was so excited to be out of the apartment.  I couldn’t contain her.  Once she even fell off a cliff as the bank eroded and I had to quickly swing her up by the leash and collar to save her.  Mocha is much fatter now, but we are working on it.

Mocha The Puggle

When we got to Saddle Mountain State Natural Area her nose was working overtime.  There were lots of people hitting the trail, and camping.  I brought water, and gave the puggle breaks.  I made her sit, and she would lay in the shade when she could.  The hike is 5 miles round trip,  but the elevation change is brutal. It’s 1603 feet to be exact, with the top at 3283 feet. Mainly I was concerned about her paws bleeding.  There is lots of metal fencing on the ground to contain the loose rocks, and I didn’t know if that would bother her.  On the way up I kept Moc on the leash, 1 because there’s cliffs, and 2 because lots of people were coming down the trail with dogs.  I wanted to protect her.  However, on the way down I decided it would be better to let her follow me off leash.  She didn’t want to walk on the trail because the gravel was hurting her.  So she waddled along side the main path, and didn’t hurt anything.  Plus, it was getting late, and we were basically the last down.

Mocha Survival Puggle

On the way we checked out a geocache hidden on a side trail.  I’ve found it before, but I wanted to see all the new stuff inside, and sign the log book again.  Not many people locate it each year.  I traded in a emergency paracord bracelet for a CD with clues to another cache.  I’m getting into geocaching because it’s something fun to do while hiking, or when you’re just out and about.  There’s more than 2 million geocaches planted around the world.  This hobby also forces me to analyze and use maps too.  I filmed Mocha and I checking out what was inside the ammo box this time.

After a few solid hours of hiking, Mocha, my cameraman, and I reached the peak.  We all sat down and took in the majestic views of the North Coast.  You can see the whole coastline, from Seaside well into Washington State.  Poor Mocha was beat.  She was gasping for air, and I was a little worried about her.  We had just enough water left to quench her thirst, but more would have been nice.  Usually there is a spring about halfway up that I feel is safe to drink from.  My dog did lap up the puddle there, but I wasn’t getting on all fours.  In the end, Mocha killed it.  I was so proud of her.  I kept her motivated with words of encouragement, smacking her butt, and tossing turkey jerky in her mouth.  On the way back I told Moc we were going back to the car and home for ice cubes (her fav).  My legs were jello, and Mocha was walking funny, but we accomplished the mission.  Next time we will be even stronger, and smarter about it.  

Cam and MochaMocha knew we were going to the top.  If you want to rock a paracord bracelet for emergency preparedness made by Survival Bros, send $8 to cameronmckirdy@hotmail.com via PayPal.  Thanks and best wishes from us both.

Produced by Cameron McKirdy

I shot this HD video while camping in the Olympic National Forest near Forks Washington.  It’s truly an amazing park.  You must visit.  I tented right near the river, and there’s plenty of challenging hiking trails nearby.  These elk were amazing, and quite noisy.  They were making all kinds of crazy calls.  I wanted to pet one.  Another part of me saw dinner. 

Yesterday I saw this amazing buck in Astoria OR. I grabbed the camera, and got right up to him. He walked my way. I thought it was about to go down! I would have won. Still, what a beautiful beast.
– Cameron McKirdy

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Pets love trails. We run, jump, and play in the mud, and our puppy does the same. Here at Survival Bros, we care about our animals, so we take good care of them, and prepare for their survival needs. This is a short list of items to have in a pet first aid kit. Some of these things you may already have on hand. All items can fit in a large Ziploc bag, which we like so everything is easy to see. Any portable waterproof container would be wise. Or you can even make a tactical dog vest, so they can carry their own gear. The point is, make one that works for you and your furry friend too.

  • Blunt tipped scissors to cut away clumped hair, or tangled sticks without poking your pet.
  • Bottle of eye wash solution is a great sterile way to flush any debris from your pets eye.
  • Hydrogen Peroxide works well for cleaning small wounds.
  • Triple antibiotic ointment for dressing wounds after they have been properly cleaned.
  • Sterile nonstick pads are best as adhesive strips don’t really stick to puppy fur (Vet Wrap).
  • Nail trimmers, tweezers, and comb.
  • A leash in case it’s not your animal your treating, you still need to be able to control them if they are able to walk.
  • A big clean towel to dry them off, warm them up, or if needed, stop bleeding by applying pressure.
  • A muzzle that fits your animal is good to have in your kit in case they are scared, or hurt bad enough. You love them, they love you, but in a fear moment while you’re trying to help them, they might bite you. Also consider putting a plastic cone around their head to prevent further injury.
  • Rain coat or poncho with hood.
  • Harnesses are helpful.
  • Also, make sure to have your animal’s tags on them in case they get lost. You can also have a microchip implanted in your pet for security reasons, and tracking. It’s a little 1984, but it could come in handy if a collar breaks.
  • Instant Cold Pack for swelling.
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine) for insect bites and bee stings.
  • Rectal thermometer.
  • Gloves.
  • Extra pet food and water.

Basic first aid is applicable to animals and humans. Knowing how to properly clean and dress a wound is survival basics. Being able to do it on yourself, someone else, or a pet means you can potentially safe the life of a loved one. In an emergency, remember to keep calm, think rationally, and address one issue at a time. Be extreme out there people, and take your pets outside with you! And please visit Survival Bros again soon. Peace.