Archive for the ‘Cold Weather’ Category

By Cameron McKirdy I sling a day pack on my back nearly every day.  I’ve mentioned the types of things I have in it before, like gear, food, and a warm change of clothes.  So when I discovered the Ribz Front Pack, I was stoked.  This innovative, steroid injected version of a fanny pack solves many of the challenges I face when backpacking.  Here I am with it on the Hummocks Trailhead near Mount St. Helens in Washington State. Ribz Front Pack One issue I have with a regular backpack is I’m constantly taking it off to grab water, my cell phone, or something else that isn’t handy.  With Ribz Wear, it’s all right in front of me, so I can continue trail blazing.  I also mention in the video how backpacks catch on trees when I have to duck under them.  It usually happens a few times each hike, and I practically have to crawl under the obstacle.  With my gear in front, navigating through heavy brush is considerably easier.  The best part of this system is the pack is easy to adjust.  My Dad’s chest and waist are smaller than mine, so after he used it, a quick tug on the straps in back and in front made it comfortable again for me.  Plus, Ribz have long, padded shoulder straps, so it feels like a natural extension of your body.   Mount St. Helens Adventures Map Check out the map of different Mount St. Helens Adventures.  Back to the Ribz Front Pack review, I must mention the Large version I tested can hold absurd amounts, with an 11 liter capacity.  Even with it packed full, I was able to swing my arms freely.  My dad wore it, and noted that you could still use hiking poles with it on.  Ribz makes smaller Front Packs with 8 liters of room too.  Internally, there are separate pouches to keep smaller items organized.  These elastic lined compartments will hold all your tools close to your ribs, and prevent them from rattling around.  We both ran with it, and the pack remained snug, not bouncing around, or swaying side to side.Mount St. Helens View In conclusion, the Ribz Front Pack is an excellent tool itself.  The quality is unbelievable, and far superior to what I expected.  It’s lightweight, at only 11 ounces, so it beats a backpack there too.  However, I think it would be best suited for use with a rear pack, so the weight of your supplies can be evenly distributed forward and back, thus giving you better posture than wearing one or the other.  But if you’re into ultralight backpacking, Ribz might be a dream come true.  You can’t machine wash Ribz, but it cleans up nicely with a wet rag.  I love the Cordura brand water resistant, ripstop material it’s fabricated with.  I will be sporting my Ribz for a long time.  I like it so much I want the smaller 8 liter pack too for shorter trips, and cross country running.  I just don’t know which color to get next.  Check out http://www.ribzwear.com to grab yours.

Cam makes instant coffee with an emergency water packet at Loowit Lookout near Mt. St. Helens in Washington State.  Subscribe to Survival Bros on Youtube for more!  Thanks for watching!  Feel free to comment.

Mt. St. Helens SelfieCam snaps a selfie with his dad on the trail

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Produced By Cameron McKirdy with Tactical Gypsy

Homeless.  That’s what we were.  My bro and I stayed on this boat for weeks last summer to avoid paying rent, and getting a regular job.  We were free, and so was our lodging.  But with that comes less.  We had to deal with a lot of crap.  It’s noisy in the Skipanon and Warrenton Oregon Marina.  Sleeping is challenging.  People work on boats at all hours, so there’s usually people clamoring, and trucks hauling.

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Skipanon Warrenton Oregon Marina at Night

Once we had to stay on the boat right after our host varnished the interior.  We opened the craft up, but the stench was still awful.  I got a headache, and while grateful for the place to lay down, I was ready to split and catch the bus into town.  In the HD video above we got a solid fire going, but I didn’t film the smoke that filled the cabin, and it was horrible.  I got a headache from that too.  Again, we lifted the lid on the boat, and opened up the ceiling, but sacrificed warmth.  The Survival Bros slept on a wet mattress because the boat had recently sank.

We had a key to the shower and restroom, but that was a hike from the boat.  Plus, we didn’t want to get hassled by security, so we kept our creeping to a minimum, and laid low.  The smart move was to pee in plastic bottles to avoid detection.  However, the other fisherman on the marina were typically very helpful.  We had their assistance many times when we had to do work on the boat, or move it to another slip.  Speaking of, the rent for a spot there is only $70 per month, and our buddy paid that.  You have to pay a little more for electricity, but it’s still the cheapest place to crash in town.  In exchange for a bed, Tactical Gypsy worked on the boat, making sure the bilge was pumping out water, or whatever.  I kept him company, and learned what I could from the Maritime Scientist.  It was an adventure for sure, and I’m happy to share it with you.  More homelessness tales soon.  Thanks for supporting Survival Bros.  Peace and love.

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Selling waterlogged boat motors for cash